Brands
 

Posts Tagged ‘sunflower’

Just Launched: Sunflower 4600 Series Disc Rippers

Sunflower 4600 Series Disc RipperThe all-new Sunflower® 4600 Series Disc Rippers are built for North American professional farmers in search of a rugged machine to handle challenging soil and residue conditions. The SF4600 Series combines deep tillage with a proven disc harrow design for primary surface tillage, fracturing subsoil compaction while sizing and mixing residue throughout the entire working depth of the disc blades. The 4600 Series is built on a solid frame with heavy-duty disc harrows and shanks designed to deeply penetrate heavily compacted soils while easily slicing through tough crop residue to maximize crop yield potential.

Available in four models, the 4600 Series is built on a heavy-duty frame with working widths large enough to maximize a tractor’s horsepower.

  • Largest disc ripper in the industry
  • Four models from 14 ft. up to 26-feet, 2-inches
  • Available with 7 to 13 shanks by model
  • Two ranks of industry-leading, 28-inch diameter, 5/16-inch thick disc blades slice and redistribute heavy crop residue
  • Three finishing harrow attachments level residue and reduce clod size in varying soils

Just Launched: Sunflower 1800 Series Tandem Disc Harrows

Sunflower 1880 Tandem Disc Harrow

The all-new Sunflower® 1800 Series Tandem Disc Harrows are built for North American producers who need a heavy-duty disc harrow capable of breaking through hard-packed soils and thick crop residue for primary tillage needs. The Sunflower 1800 Series combines bigger blades and wider blade spacing with larger frames to produce some of the highest weight-per-blade specifications in the industry for reliable performance in the field. These disc harrows feature cutting widths from 14-feet, 4-inches up to 39-feet, with a weight-per-blade range of 333 pounds to 635 pounds.

The Sunflower 1800 Series Tandem Disc Harrows are available in two models with a variety of widths and configurations that cater to the specific needs and field conditions of individual farming operations.

  • Available with 28- or 30-inch plain or notched disc blades, spaced at 11- or 13-inch intervals to slice and mix crop residue
  • Spring-cushion gangs prevent damage in the field from rocks
  • Gang angle positioning can be adjusted depending on crop, field conditions
  • Constructed of high-strength 4-inch-by-8-inch tubular steel to withstand horizontal stress and rotational torque
  • Total weight ranges between 11,152 pounds and 37,568 pounds.

Just Launched: Sunflower 1700 Series Offset Disc Harrows

Sunflower 1700 Series Offset Disc HarrowThe all-new Sunflower® 1700 Series Offset Disc Harrows offer the highest weight-per-blade specifications in the industry for optimal soil penetration and crop residue management in the field. Featuring large-diameter disc blades and the necessary weight needed to easily tear though hard soils and thick crop residue, the SF 1700 Series Offset Disc Harrows combine innovative technology with heavy-duty durability and toughness for optimal soil penetration and crop residue management in the field.

The Series consists of two models that allow for numerous machine configurations with a variety of widths and weights — from 299 pounds to 514 pounds depending on the model and its configuration. The SF 1700 Series working widths range from 11 feet up to 24 feet, 11 inches, giving producers a multitude of choices so they can select the offset disc harrow that’s ideal for their operation.

  • Two models: SF1710 rigid frame, SF1730 flexible frame.
  • Spring-cushion gang design helps prevent unnecessary damage in the field
  • Configured with 28- or 30-inch notched disc blades spaced at 11- or 13-inch intervals for mixing action
  • Adjustable gang angle positioning allow for establishment of ideal seedbed
  • Heavy-duty tubular steel frame is built to withstand rigors of aggressive tillage
  • Total weight ranges between 10,329 pounds and 22,860 pounds

DISCussions: No Words

I find myself in an awkward predicament.  As a blogger, my role is to share.  As an observer, I was speechless.

It was time to make a “farm tour” and check the fields.  Expanses of cut wheat shared the horizon with earnest fields of beans, milo, corn and the occasional fallow ground.  Cliche though it may be, I stood in the road’s intersection and looked to each compass point.  The silence surrounded me.

I thought of the generations of families who have chosen to be good stewards and respect the land.  I thought of the faded billboard reminding passersby that “one Kansas farmer feeds 128 people and you”.  I thought of our neighbors in North Dakota and along the Missouri river whose fields and homes are under water; those in Oklahoma and Texas whose crops died for lack of moisture; and those in the Southwest fighting sand storms and wildfires.

Then I smiled.

Knowing, in my heart, “country folk” will lend a hand as needed; then rebuild and replant.  After all —- they have a world to feed.

Editors note: In honor of World Population Day we celebrate all of the farmers that work hard day-in and day-out to provide enough food to support our ever-growing populations. AGCO works hard to provide farmers with high-tech solutions so that they CAN feed the world. So as you eat your breakfast this morning, take a moment and think about the farmers that contributed to everything you are eating. Learn more about world population growth.

DISCussions: “Putting the Fun in FUNdraising”

Team co-captain Arlene Zachary cuts Kirk Cool’s 13-inch ponytail for Locks of Love

How do 350 employees generate $6,631 for the American Cancer Society’s “Relay for Life” event? They put FUN into fundraising. For more than 15 years, the employees at the AGCO-Beloit and Cawker City facilities have supported their Relay team by opening their wallets and giving generously. You may remember reading about this in an earlier post.

This year the AGCO team was able to contribute to two worthy organizations, American Cancer Society and Locks of Love , through the “Get ‘er Cut Fund”. Kirk Cool, Beloit Machine Shop Supervisor offered to cut 10 inches of his ponytail for $500 for the Relay. Then he agreed to an additional one-half inch for every $50 over the goal.

The goal of $500 was met fairly quickly. The fund leveled off at $615 until someone donated $85 which put the haircut at 12 inches. Just before the deadline for contributing, an individual presented $100. During a plant-wide employee meeting June 8, Kirk Cool got a haircut from team co-captain Arlene Zachary; and Locks of Love got a 13-inch gift.

This year’s team members are: Arlene Zachary, co-captain; Eve Flynn, co-captain; Steven Isley; Kathy Hargett; Ethan Smith-Esogbue; Ruth Roberts, and Chandra Ackerman. AGCO employees in Beloit and Cawker City have demonstrated their support of the Relay for Life event for many years. They have donated their personal time and money because they believe there should be more birthdays.

What is the funnest thing you have ever done for charity?

Join Us on Twitter