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Posts Tagged ‘Hesston’

Baling Efficiency Redefined

Key changes that contribute to increased capacity in the 1840 small rectangular baler are the upturned augers, along with the redesign of the stuffer action to follow the contour of the stuffer floor.

Key changes that contribute to increased capacity in the 1840 small rectangular baler are the upturned augers, along with the redesign of the stuffer action to follow the contour of the stuffer floor.

Josh Moorefield, a hay producer from Shreve, Ohio, recently put two balers from different companies to the test in a field consisting of orchardgrass/alfalfa and timothy/alfalfa mixes. He then loaded two semi trailers destined for a customer in Miami, Fla. One truck received bales of both mixes that were bundled by the new Hesston® by Massey Ferguson Model 1840 small rectangular baler that Moorefield had been field testing; the other truck was loaded with bales of both mixes from his competitive-brand baler.

Thanks to the uniform bale size and density of the Hesston bales, Moorefield was able to fit an additional 3,800 pounds on the load. For his customers, that means lower freight cost and more hay.

Building on the success of its predecessor, the Model 1839, Massey Ferguson significantly enhanced the 1840 in terms of high-capacity baling and rugged reliability. The design engineers started up front where pickup and feeder capacity have both been improved—especially in large, uneven and varying crop conditions.

New features also include storage for 10 rolls of twine for fewer stops, an adjustable drawbar that allows attachment to a wider range of tractors and a new, optional knotter fan to keep the knotters clean. The latter is part of a high-performance package that also includes hydraulic bale density for tighter bales. Last, but certainly not least, the 1840 adds 14 more inches to the OptiForm™ bale chamber to ensure greater consistency in bale shape and density.

Higher capacity, faster feeding and denser, more uniform bales, regardless of the crop or crop conditions, are also key features in a new line of Hesston by Massey Ferguson 2900 Series round balers. Available in two models—the MF2946 produces a 4- x 6-foot bale and the MF2956 creates a 5- x 6-foot bale—the new balers feature a redesigned rotor feeder system with adjustable feed auger strippers, as well as more room above the side augers to smoothly pull the crop into the bale chamber. While the new features provide better feeding in all crops, they’re particularly valuable in residue crops such as cornstalks, soybean residue and wheat stubble.

“The new Model 1840 rectangular baler and 2900 Series round balers both feature design enhancements that keep pace with the productivity needs of our customers,” concludes Dean Morrell, product marketing manager for hay and forage equipment. “The Hesston legacy of innovation and commitment to quality is evident in the detailed engineering and rigorous testing that each of these models has undergone.”

Find out more about the 1800 Series Small Square Balers at http://www.hesston.com/products/square-balers/1800-series-small-square-balers.

Uncovering the Hesston Story: Lyle Yost

For 65 years, this rural burg on the eastern edge of the Great Prairie has been home to a brand that shares its name and is fertile ground for the development of game-changing agricultural machines.

Lyle Yost

Lyle Yost

During the Dust Bowl years, a “hill” on an otherwise flat stretch of the Great Prairie was often a piece of farm machinery buried by the era’s black blizzards of blowing topsoil, then deserted due to a hole in the social fabric called the Great Depression. Folks did what they could to survive, and a young Kansan named Lyle Yost helped make ends meet by scouring the countryside around his family’s farm for these mounds of dirt and steel.

“He was as young as 14,” says his daughter Susan, “and as soon as Dad learned how to drive, he would take the truck out into the countryside and look for [abandoned] farm equipment.” Yost, who passed away last year, would excavate what he found and bring it home, where he and his father would use it for spare parts or repair it for sale. “Not only did Dad learn how to build and rebuild [farm equipment], but he got acquainted with farmers,” Susan says. “He learned from them and found out what they needed. The idea of Hesston Corp. was planted when he was a teenager. I don’t think he knew the direction, but he knew that he had a calling, which was to help farmers.”

That direction became clear years later when he took on a problem that afflicted practically every farmer and harvester who owned a combine back in the day. Unloading just took too much time. Yost’s contemporaries used shovels and gravity to get the grain out of the bin, losing valuable time to get the grain up and out of harm’s way.

Yost, however, had an idea for a better way to move that grain, and after a particularly difficult harvest in 1947 and with memories of Dust Bowl storms still fresh, he and blacksmith Adin Holdeman went to work developing his unloading auger design. They made five of them in about a month, Susan recalls, and sent Yost’s cousin Earl Burner out to sell them. “He got back in 3 hours and said he needed 10 more.”

When they returned to the harvest the next summer using their new machine, others witnessed the speed at which the augers unloaded grain, and orders began arriving from as far as Texas and North Dakota. Buoyed by that success, the three men set up an assembly line near their homes in Hesston, and Hesston Manufacturing was born.

More than a half-century later, Yost’s focus on farmer-oriented solutions lives on today. Still located in the small, rural town where it all started, the Hesston facility has gone on to develop some of the most productive machines in agriculture, with the harvesting equipment made there now being sold worldwide.

Read the full story at http://www.myfarmlife.com/advantage/uncovering-the-hesston-story/.

Hesston Sponsored Cowboys Win Big at 2012 Wrangler National Finals Rodeo

Hesston by Massey Ferguson (http://www.hesston.com) marked the end of the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo (WNFR) (www.prorodeo.com/series_home.aspx) watching its two sponsored cowboys, Luke Branquinho and Cody Teel, earn World Championship titles on December 15, 2012. In addition to sponsoring Branquinho and Teel, the 2012 WNFR marked Hesston’s second year back as a major sponsor of the event. Hesston staff and dealers hosted more than 400 customers from Dec. 6–15 in Las Vegas for rodeo’s biggest event.

The excitement was high as Hesston guests cheered on steer wrestler Branquinho and bull rider Teel during ten rounds of competition at the WNFR. Going into round ten, neither the steer wrestling nor the bull rider competition had a clear front-runner, making for an exciting evening.

Branquinho, a steer wrestler from Los Alamos, Calif., entered the 2012 WNFR as the reigning world champion. He put up strong runs throughout the ten-day competition, winning round four and placing second in rounds five and seven. Going into round ten Saturday night, there was no clear frontrunner among the steer wrestlers, allowing Branquinho to rise to the top and win a fourth world championship. Branquinho’s win marks the first back-to-back steer wrestling world championship since Ote Berry won in 1990–91. The only other steer wrestler to win more world championships than Branquinho is Homer Pettigrew, who won six world titles in the 1940s.

Twenty-year-old bull rider Teel, from Kountze, Texas, made his first trip the WFNR in 2012. The past high school and collegiate champion posted strong rides throughout the WNFR, including winning round four. After ten go-arounds, Teel was able to hold off his competition and win his first world championship Saturday night, an incredible achievement for such a young bull rider.

“We are very proud of Luke and Cody and their performances during the Wrangler National Finals Rodeo,” says Laura Lines, senior brand marketing specialist for Hesston. “Being a part of such a huge event, and seeing our competitors win, has been exciting for all of us. We’re looking forward to sponsoring them again in 2013.”

The WNFR, held in Las Vegas from Dec. 6–15, is sanctioned by the PRCA, the largest and oldest rodeo-sanctioning body in the world and the recognized leader in professional rodeo.

Behind the Scenes: A Look in Hesston Windrower Engineering

Ever ask yourself, “What were the engineers thinking when they designed this?”  Well growing up on a farm I asked myself that question a lot. To help better answer, we interviewed our WR Series Windrowers engineering design team to see exactly what they were thinking in the development of an entirely new design of windrower. Find out what new technologies they were able to incorporate into the machine and what makes the new WR Series the most advanced windrower on the market. What do you think?

WR Series Windrower Test Drive

Recently I had a chance to demonstrate our new Hesston by Massey Ferguson WR Series windrower to hay & forage growers in the San Joaquin Valley in California. The responses from the demonstrations was so overwhelmingly positive that I had to capture it on video. The one thing I heard loud and clear from everyone was that our new WR Series didn’t just meet their expectations, it exceeded them in many ways.

One thing that I found very interesting about the San Joaquin Valley is that they still use mostly sickle headers to mow hay, instead of rotary disc heads. When I asked why, they said it was because they didn’t believe a rotary disc head could do as good of a job as a sickle head. But when we mowed their fields with our new 9196 TwinMax™ advanced conditioning disc head featuring our RazorBar™ low-profile cutterbar next to their sickle headers, they couldn’t believe the cut quality. To quote one grower “This machine is doing a beautiful job in alfalfa, I don’t think you could ask for a better job”.

But don’t just take my word for it, check out this video of WR Series test drive interviews.