Powered by Google
 

Posts Tagged ‘Farm Safety 4 Just Kids’

The Power of Electricity

This is another great farm safety message brought to you by Farm Safety 4 Just Kids. Electricity is powerful. Agriculture relies on electricity to keep the barn lights on, to run equipment and to turn the alarm clock on every morning. Electricity is also a powerful hazard on the farm, one that demands respect.The Kentucky Association of Electric Cooperatives teaches farm safety at the Mammouth Cave Farm Safety 4 Just Kids chapter's safety day.

Lack of knowledge and skill are the leading cause of incidents involving electricity. Teach children how electricity works, and what types of materials conduct electricity and which ones don’t.

Once youth are old enough, trained and qualified to drive farm equipment, teach them to lower things like augers before crossing under a power line. It’s also important to teach them to stay in the vehicle if they become entangled in an over head power line. If you’ve explained how electricity works, they’ll know touching the machinery while stepping on the ground will complete the circuit.

In addition, make sure overhead power lines are well maintained and have adequate clearance to avoid these situations.

Here are a few more electricity safety tips:

• Keep face plates on switches and outlet

• Keep electrical panels free of dust and debris

• Keep electrical panels covered to reduce shock and fire hazard

• Use properly maintained tools and equipment that is double insulated

• Do not use electrical tools around water

• Equip the shop area with Ground Fault Circuit Interrupters and use 3-prong grounding plugs

• Use undamaged electrical cords and do not carry tools by their cords

• Grip the plug, not the cord, to unplug a tool

• Switch off and unplug a tool before you change parts or clean it, or if it begins to smoke or burn

• Instruct children in proper behavior around and respect of electricity

Keep everyone safe around electricity. Prevent the electricity we need so much from harming the ones we love the most.

For more information about farm safety, visit http://www.fs4jk.org/.

Chemical Safety: More Than Just Pesticides!

The following post about chemical safety on the farm was submitted by Tracy Schlater from Farm Safety 4 Just Kids.

Chemical Look-Alike Challege

Is it a chemical or is it edible? Some chemicals can look very similar to beverages and food. Motor oil and pancake syrup. Gasoline and apple juice. Windex and sports drinks.

Ask a child about farm chemicals and their first response will probably refer to what’s applied to crops, such as pesticides or insecticides; but it’s so much more than that. Gas, diesel fuel, anti-freeze, motor oil, and coolant required for farm equipment are considered chemicals too, just like household products like bleach, bug spray, and toilet bowl cleaner. Kids are exposed to those dangers beyond the farm as well, making it even more important for them to realize the danger.

Teach your kids to recognize these terms:

CAUTION – (yellow) could result inn minor or moderate injury if hazard is not avoided.

WARNING – (orange) could cause serious injury or death if hazard is not avoided.

DANGER – (red) a high probability of serious injury or death if hazard is not avoided.

A few tips to prevent chemical exposure:

  • Store chemicals in their original container in a locked area
  • Be a good role model – wear personal protective equipment
  • Dispose of chemicals and their containers properly
  • Keep kids and toys away when applying chemicals
  • Wash clothes worn while applying chemicals separately
  • Close all containers and put out of reach of children.

Take five seconds and add the following number to your cell phone contacts list if you are in the United States. If you are in other parts of the world, we encourage you to find and store your local equivalent:

Poison Control 1-800-222-1222

Farm Safety 4 Just Kids recently released a new chemical safety education packet available in both English and Spanish. For more information, visit www.fs4jk.org or call 1-800-423-5437.

Do your children know the dangers of chemicals on your farm?

Spring Safety Tip: Share the Road!

The following post is submitted by Tracy Schlater from Farm Safety 4 Just Kids, a non-profit organization in North America which provides resources and training to individuals and communities to conduct farm safety awareness and education programs. Today’s topic talks about sharing the road with tractors and other farm equipment.

"Buckle Up or Eat Glass" edu packet

Order your copy of FS4JK's "Buckle Up or Eat Glass" educational packet

Spring has arrived most places here in North America and with it comes farmers eager to get into the fields – a drive through the country proves it. Tractors are already shuffling discs and anhydrous ammonia between fields. It won’t be long and they’ll be pulling planters down the road.

Safety is a two-way street. The implement operators need to be mindful of their size and speed. And other vehicles who share the road with farm equipment need to give these massive machines the respect they demand.

Whether you’re behind the wheel of a tractor or a passenger vehicle, remember these tips:

  • Obey all traffic laws
  • Slow down
  • Give others plenty of space
  • Use your signals
  • Put your cell phone away

For more information on rural roadway safety, visit Farm Safety 4 Just Kids at www.fs4jk.org.

What are some other important safety tips to remember about sharing the road?

Farm Safety: One Seat, One Rider

The following post is submitted by Tracy Schlater from Farm Safety 4 Just Kids, a non-profit organization in North America which provides resources and training to individuals and communities to conduct farm safety awareness and education programs. Today’s topic talks about the  “one seat, one rider” rule.

“Daddy, can I have a ride?”Farm Safety 4 Just Kids Logo

Farm parents always seek ways to instill an appreciation for the industry in their children. Riding on the tractor with Dad has long been a tradition for farm families.

Think twice next time your child asks to ride along.

Machinery – including tractors – accounts for one quarter of fatalities among children. Great strides in safety are being made by AGCO and other farm equipment manufacturers. ROPS (roll over protective structures) are standard on many tractors, and optional instructional seats are being offered. An instructional seat is the only safe option for a second person to ride on a tractor or farm implement.

Kids are always eager to go a few rounds on the tractor or combine. Next time they ask to ride with you, explain the “one seat, one rider” rule. If you don’t have an instructional seat let them know there isn’t a seat belt for them, and they have to be buckled up just like they do in the car.

While it’s hard to turn down a child with an interest in agriculture… it’s easier to bury a tradition than a child.

For more information on tractor safety, visit Farm Safety 4 Just Kids at www.fs4jk.org.

What tips do you have to share about keeping kids safe on the farm?