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Posts Tagged ‘Agriculture’

Neat and nimble compact tractors from Massey Ferguson

Massey Ferguson is strengthening its position in the Compact tractor sector with the launch of two new models at the EIMA Show, Bologna. The 46hp, MF 1747 and 38hp, MF 1740 are available with either a hydrostatic transmission with cab, or in platform versions with a manual transmission.

mf1700_eima

MF 1747 HC and 1740 HC models offer a fully hydrostatic transmission and are fitted with a full safety cab as standard. The three-range transmission is controlled electrically and operated by a floor pedal, along with a left-hand shuttle lever, providing fingertip direction changes. A cruise control button allows operators to set the forward speed, which is then maintained automatically.

The MF 1747 A and 1740 A models have a mechanical gearbox and come equipped with a ROPS platform as standard. The gearbox provides 12 forward and 12 reverse speeds, with Synchro reverse shuttle lever.

These versatile tractors meet the exacting demands of agricultural, amenity and horticultural users, offering the power and transmission choice to excel in a wide range of work with the hydraulic flow and control to handle modern implements with ease.

Meet the AGCO Biomass Solutions Team!

In an attempt to harness the potential of the growing biomass industry, AGCO launched its first marketing group specific to this area of agriculture. The biomass marketing group is led by its marketing manager, Glenn Farris, and his business equipment and development specialist, Ken Wagenbach.

Ken leads biomass harvesting equipment design improvements and helps partners set up, maintain and operate equipment for optimum productivity, efficiency and reliability.

Ken Headshot

Q&A with Ken:

What are some of the advantages of biomass energy production?

Biomass energy is renewable and environmentally sustainable; it reduces our dependence on fossil fuels and our carbon footprint at the same time. In biomass energy production, the agriculture sector has a way to reduce production cost while increasing yields and revenues.

What’s the most interesting thing you’ve learned about biomass since joining the AGCO Biomass Solutions team?

Biomass hits at all the core competencies of AGCO products. Properly managing crops/land and soil/water, be it purpose grown or crop residue, and renewable energy political policies have equal impact on the economy of the producer.

What is some good advice for a farmer who is interested in incorporating biomass into his or her operation?

Regardless of one’s current opinion on government policies on renewable fuels, meeting the world demand for food and fiber in 2020 and beyond will require higher yields. With higher yields and the genetics needed to get there, crop residue in the future will require very heavy tillage, new equipment design and/or removal of it entirely. As farmers/producers, we WILL need the cellulosic outlet that biomass provides.

 

Have a question for Ken? Email him your question here: AGCO_Biomass_Solutions@AGCOCorp.com.

For additional information on AGCO Biomass Solutions, please visit: http://bit.ly/AGCOBiomass.

My AGCO Ambassador Experience at Africa Summit 2014

Written by: Joy Jelimo Chelagat, 2014 AGCO Africa Ambassador

Joy Jelimo Chelagat, AGCO's 2014 Africa Ambassador

Joy Jelimo Chelagat, AGCO’s 2014 Africa Ambassador

On the 15th of January at 5:00 am in the morning I drove to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport on my trip to Berlin, Germany. Just five months before I had seen a competition online for an ambassadorship opportunity. Having only a week to the deadline, I was pretty sure that my chances were slim, but I decided to apply anyway.

To my surprise, the AGCO team got in contact with me. A few Skype interviews later I was informed that I could represent Africa at the annual AGCO Africa Summit in Berlin. Two months passed by fast and I was aboard a plane heading to Germany. The trip was long and the weather was a stark difference from the sunny Nairobi climes, but the warm welcome of the team in the Adlon Hotel made me feel at home.

The day after I arrived I hit the ground running. I had a meeting with a team of AGCO people to prepare for the activities scheduled. It was only our first meeting yet they were very friendly and resourceful. I also met Sue Musunga Chuzu, who was the first AGCO Africa Ambassador and who works now as Marketing Services Specialist at AGCO in Zambia. She shared her experiences with me and gave me some presentation tips for moderating the conference.

Agriculture is Universal

One of my tasks as Africa Ambassador was to represent AGCO at the International Green Week fair. The “Grüne Woche”, as the Germans call it, is an agricultural trade show that attracts exhibitors from around the world. Together with Marco Prehn, Sahra Malin, Sue Chuzu and Philip De Leon from AGCO we talked to numerous people about what the company is doing in Africa. One thing was evident during the fair: agriculture is a global concern. Even though the visitors and exhibitors were from far flung corners of the globe, they all came together in one place for once cause: agriculture.

The night before the AGCO Africa Summit we had an exclusive dinner with the conference‘s speakers and the top brass of the AGCO team. The room was full of exceptional people who had done great things for the African continent. From the conversations we had that evening, I could tell that the summit would be full of wonderful insights. As I woke up that Monday I was fully charged for the conference.

African Solutions

Walking into the conference hall, the excitement was palpable. You could see crowds of people huddled together immersed in conversation. You could spot top decision makers of key sectors of the agricultural industry. As the program kicked off, I was slightly nervous but as we moved along I eased up. Each speaker rose to the podium with wonderful ideas about the improvement of the agriculture industry in Kenya and on the African continent.

The speakers and panelists talked about their activities in Africa and about what they plan to do in days to come. Robert Sichinga, Agriculture Minister of Zambia, riled the crowd when he passionately explained why solutions to African agriculture have to be African. Another topic that got the audience excited was the appeal to make agriculture “sexy” for it to attract young people. Several speakers also emphasized the issue of innovation. Thus by the end of the full-day event I was more convinced than ever that agriculture is not only the present but also the future for Africa.

Yet, my trip was not all business. I had several opportunities to shop and tour the German capital. Berlin is a beautiful city with rich history: I visited the Brandenburg Gate, Checkpoint Charlie and the Holocaust memorial. Another highlight of the trip was the opportunity to meet and make friends with remarkable people from all around the globe.

All in all, this journey was an inspirational and eye-opening experience. I was able to see how small-scale innovations in the field have a global impact on food security. The importance of efficient production, transportation and distribution was also brought home. At the end of the trip I felt charged to take up my role as AGCO Africa Ambassador for the year 2014.

National Ag Day 2014

nationalagday

Yesterday we celebrated, and helped sponsor, National Ag Day 2014, the 41st anniversary of celebrating agriculture’s role in the world. Every spring, producers, agricultural associations, corporations, universities, government agencies and others join together in recognition and appreciation of the agriculture industry.

We’d like to take this time to express our deepest gratitude to the many men and women across the globe who make agriculture possible: THANK YOU!

How did you celebrate National Ag Day yesterday? We’d love to hear from you — please share your stories in the comments below.

4 Generations of Massey Ferguson

The AGCO marketing team for Australia and New Zealand recently visited  the Mazaris property in Werribee South, Australia, to get a better understanding of how Massey Ferguson has evolved alongside farmers.

The productive region is a tightly knit community only a short distance from the populous Melbourne, with furrows of vegetables growing to the roads edge, rich soil and good irrigation networks. The area supplies around 70% of lettuces consumed in Australia and has experienced adaption and change brought about through drought and tight market conditions.

Settling in the area in the 1930’s, Great Grand Father Mazaris purchased a Fergie to assist in tilling and to borrow an old cliche, the rest is history. Through four generations, the Mazaris’ have continued their connection with Massey Ferguson. The horsepower of their most recent purchase, the MF 7495,  allows for deeper tilling and increased speed while maintaining greater fuel efficiencies. The evolution of MF tractor technology is increasingly important on the Mazaris property as the cost of diesel inputs outstrip produce prices

The ability to do more with less looks likely to continue the Mazaris and Massey Ferguson connection for another generation to come.

Peter, Don and Ricky Mazaris with their MF7495

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