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Vision of the Future – Melbourne, Australia 2014

MF4700 Global Series

MF4700 Global Series at Vision of the Future, Melbourne 2014

Vision of the Future, Melbourne 2014, showcased Massey Ferguson’s range of machinery and technology solutions for grounds care applications right through to modern broad acre farming operations.

With 4,500m2 of exhibition space and over 80 display units, information kiosks and multimedia displays all under one roof, Vision of the Future was a great opportunity for agricultural operators across the APAC region to see the latest in Massey Ferguson products and Fuse technologies before the busy Harvest period.

Running over three days, the event unveiled new Massey Ferguson products as part of a wider global release.

Vision of the Future – Melbourne featured a glimpse of the new generation of Massey Ferguson products now available in Australia and New Zealand,  including the New 74-82 HP MF4700 Global Series and Massey Ferguson’s most powerful tractor yet, the new 270-370 HP MF8700 Series.

260 Massey Ferguson dealers from across the region along with over 400 customers were also introduced to the global series concept, unique in the farm machinery industry and a major component of Massey Ferguson’s Vision of the Future.

Massey Ferguson’s parent company, AGCO has already started the Global Series investment in new facilities and systems that will create a highly flexible network of manufacturing plants, enabling major units and complete tractors to be produced and assembled at multiple locations throughout the world to meet the demands of local markets.

“This is an exciting time for Massey Ferguson and our customers as we embark on a new generation of products that offer features and quality that will make them very attractive to Australian and New Zealand farmers and operators,” says Simon Hole, Director of Marketing, AGCO Australia.

Product specialists, parts specialists, dealers and finance representatives were available with the latest information and product knowledge about the exciting Massey Ferguson range and the future of Global Series.

Also featured at the event was the exciting and ongoing development in technology products.

Taking the central stage across the three day event, Fuse technology Product Manager Jeremy Duniam outlined the huge benefits of technologies currently available on Massey Ferguson products and the enormous market potential these products have, as well as their positive impact on the profitability and efficiency of farming worldwide.

“Fuse is a new generational open approach to precision agriculture for Massey Ferguson products.  Fuse connects the entire crop cycle from enterprise planning to planting, crop care, and harvesting and grain storage. For Massey Ferguson customers it means access to seamless advance technology and data management that can be integrated into their current operations and service providers with immediate benefits and improvements in efficiencies into the future. It is an exciting time for advanced technologies”, Jeremy said.

Fuse Technologies Presentation to Massey Ferguson Dealers

Fuse Technologies Presentation to Massey Ferguson Dealers

Dealers and customers also got the opportunity to be amongst the first people in the world to test drive the new MF4700 Global Series, with several MF4708 models available at an off site testing location.

The Vision of the Future event was a huge success and the Massey Ferguson team at AGCO Australia thanks all APAC attendees, many of whom travelling from around Asia Pacific, New Zealand  and regional Australia, for their positive participation in the event.

New AGCO Dealer Dedicated to Supporting Innovation in Local Farming

Traction AG Horsham

Traction AG Horsham

Farmers and contractors in the Wimmera region of Western Victoria, Australia have a new partner supporting their businesses.

Traction AG has been appointed as the AGCO Dealer for the export focussed broad acre district that produces cereal, pulse and oilseed crops as well as some livestock.

New Dealer Principals Kym Grosser, Frank Delahunty and Peter Blair combine a vast range of expertise with backgrounds in engineering, machinery sales, business and farming. The Traction AG team have over 150 years of experience and are passionate about machinery that delivers performance, efficiency and productivity.

Celebrating the opening of the Horsham premises, 160 local farmers and contractors were invited to enjoy a social evening and meet with the Traction AG staff and AGCO representatives.

The event was a great opportunity for attendees to see the exciting AGCO range of products and speak with Traction AG staff and AGCO representatives about innovations and technology that can help them drive efficiencies in their farming operations.

TractionAg_1

Will de Fégely – Business Manager , Kym Grosser – Director and Head of Sales & Heath Miller – Farm Machinery Sales Manager

AGCO Area Sales Manager West Victoria, Chris Browne was impressed with the increasing interest in efficient farming practices.

“It was great to see some new and familiar faces at the event and hear a lot of positive views on the increasing importance of technology and improved efficiencies in farming practices in the Wimmera region. There is a lot of enthusiasm for products that tick all the boxes in broad acre farming which is increasingly about economies of scale”, said Chris Browne,

Traction AG Business Manager Will de Fégely was keen to catch up with guests and also spoke of the increasing significance local farmers are giving to efficient farming systems

“It was a good opportunity for farmers to meet our staff and get a look at our new premises as well as the range of AGCO products. The region has increasing demand for technology that will drive down costs in broad acre farming. With our Horsham and Nhill branches, we are looking forward to meeting this demand for a complete product range that exceeds the expectations of customers and is backed up by reliable service support and a global parts network”, Will said.

Traction AG is set to open their Nhill branch in October during the Nhill Show. The team is looking forward to a bright future supporting the Wimmera farming community with products and service support that meet the demands of modern operators in the region.

2014 Farm Progress Show a Success!

Another Farm Progress Show has come and gone, and what an accomplishment it was! This year visitors noticed something different on the AGCO lot. We turned the entire AGCO lot into a scaled-down version of a farm to demonstrate new ways to tackle the complex challenges of farming. We offered up the latest innovations from our brands, plus we showed how to get more from your operations using AGCO’s next-generation approach to precision ag technology.

AGCO Farm

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AGCO Educational Series at the 2014 Farm Progress Show

Farm Progress Show AGCO

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we gear up for the 2014 Farm Progress Show, we’re excited to share the full schedule of our educational series, a new addition to the AGCO lineup. The Fuse Technologies Pavilion, located on lot #1002, will be hosting a number of presentations covering a range of issues concerning technology, productivity and profitability. Presentations include:

  • Who’s Watching Your Data? Corporations are interested in your agronomic data. What’s your position? We’ll help you decide by offering perspectives on the issue of data privacy. Wednesday, 10:00 a.m.
  • There’s a Problem with Your Shoe! The secret to minimizing grain loss and maintaining a clean sample in higher- yielding, higher-moisture corn is in managing your combine’s shoe load. In this session, AGCO’s Kevin Bien explains why and offers solutions. Tuesday, 11:00 a.m. and Wednesday, 3:00 p.m.
  • Advancement of Rural Cell Internet Coverage. Expanded cell coverage will enable new technologies on the farm. How can you profit? Tuesday, 2:00 p.m.
  • Getting the Most out of Tillage. An informative presentation on the history of tillage, alternative tillage methods and how to optimize your tool’s performance. Tuesday, 3:00 p.m. Wednesday, 11:00 a.m.
  • Reduce Compaction. Increase Yield. Soil compaction has been proven to reduce yield by as much as 10 to 15%. In this session, we’ll talk about technologies that can help reduce compaction, including tracks systems, large flotation tires and automatic tire inflation. Tuesday, 10:00 a.m.
  • It’s All About the Kitchen! Managing job stress is an important aspect of farmer health and productivity. Here we make the business case for operator comfort and discuss recent equipment advancements, including cab and front axle suspension, ballasting techniques and guidance systems. Wednesday, 2:00 p.m.
  • Turning Trash into Treasure. There are dollars to be made with the trash your combine leaves behind. In this session, we’ll discuss the emerging biomass market – what it is, how you can profit and how to get started. Tuesday, 1:00 p.m.
  • Right Place. Right Product. Right Time. Accurate product placement is critical to the successful growth of a crop. This session will not only discuss the various product delivery options available but a number of other application- specific technologies that help deliver higher yields. Wednesday 1:00 p.m.

Please make sure to come early as seating is limited.

Not able to attend Farm Progress this year? Follow AGCO coverage on our Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and YouTube accounts.

 

Other important information:
2014 Farm Progress Show: August 26 – 28, 2014; Boone, Iowa
AGCO: Lot #1002

Thermochemical Processing: Converting Biomass into Fuels and Chemicals

By: Robert C. Brown, Director, and Robert Mills, Communications Specialist, Bioeconomy Institute, Iowa State University

The use of fermentation to produce ethanol from corn and other biomass is well known in the agricultural world. There are, however, other technologies that can convert biomass into fuels and chemicals. Foremost among these are thermochemical processes, which use heat and catalysis to break down biomass to intermediates that can be upgraded to transportation fuels.

Thermochemical processing uses heat and pressure to convert various types of feedstocks into fuels and chemicals.

Thermochemical processing uses heat and pressure to convert various types of feedstocks into fuels and chemicals.

One advantage of thermochemical processing is that the end result can be “drop-in fuels,” those that are fully compatible with the existing fuel infrastructure. While not perfect, these drop-in fuels are good enough to run in today’s engines without modification.

Another advantage to thermochemical processing is that most systems can work with a variety of biomass feedstocks. Often the feedstock is lignocellulosic biomass, such as corn stover, switchgrass, miscanthus, wood, etc. But thermochemical processing can also use lipid-rich biomass such as distillers dried grains and algae as well as mixed wastes from commercial and municipal sources.

There are two basic types of thermochemical processing, indirect and direct liquefaction. Indirect liquefaction includes gasification, where the solid biomass is heated to create synthesis gas, or syngas, that is subsequently upgraded to liquid fuels. Various catalysts are then used to convert the gas into alcohols or hydrocarbons. The advantages of gasification is that the process produces a uniform product and it is commercially proven. Gasification, however, requires technologies to clean the gases, which are still under development, and the capital costs can be high.

Direct liquefaction uses heat and pressure to convert the biomass into liquids which can then be further upgraded into finished products. Direct liquefaction includes pyrolysis and solvent liquefaction. In the case of pyrolysis, biomass is heated in the absence of oxygen. The process yields bio-oil, syngas, and a solid product known as biochar. The bio-oil can be upgraded to drop-in fuels. Pyrolysis can be performed at relatively small scales, allowing it to take place close to the source of biomass rather than moving biomass to one large, centralized processing facility. One of the major problems with pyrolysis is that the bio-oil is unstable, complicating its conversion into fuels.

Iowa State University researchers discuss a new pyrolysis pilot plant during its construction. The plant is now up and running and is used to research the multi-stage fractionation of bio-oil, a process that promises a way to economically convert biomass into many value-added products.

Iowa State University researchers discuss a new pyrolysis pilot plant during its construction. The plant is now up and running and is used to research the multi-stage fractionation of bio-oil, a process that promises a way to economically convert biomass into many value-added products.

At Iowa State University, we have invented a process to condense the pyrolysis gases in fractions, resulting in better, more stable products. The economics of fast pyrolysis are promising. In addition to producing fuels and chemicals from the bio-oil, the biochar may also have economic value. Consisting mostly of carbon, biochar can be used a soil amendment, helping retain moisture and nutrients. There is also research underway to use biochar as a filter medium for purifying water.

Solvent liquefaction, or solvolysis, is similar to pyrolysis except that it is performed in a solvent at elevated pressure. Though the fundamental chemistry of solvolysis is not well understood, the technology has promising economics. The process can upgrade bio-oil in a way similar to oil refining, and it can create sugars which can be further upgraded without expensive enzymes.

In addition to extensive research into thermochemical technologies, there are also many efforts underway to commercialize these technologies. Like all start-ups, these efforts have met with various degrees of success. There are, however, several pilot-scale systems being tested and commercial plants being built.

Bioenergy is a complex topic. There are many pathways from raw material to finished product. What’s more, bioenergy technology must be viewed in context of larger energy issues and policies. You can learn more in a book written for the general public, “Why are We Producing Biofuels,” by Robert C. Brown and Tristan R. Brown. The book is available on Amazon. You can read the first chapter for free online at: http://www.brownia.com/content/whyareweproducingbiofuels_excerpt.pdf.

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