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A Massey Ferguson wind has blown in North Jutland

In December 2014, the owner of Bejstrup, Mr. Per Kold Kristiansen, one of the largest contractor in Denmark, held an “Open House” to celebrate its 60th birthday. More than 3000 visitors attended the event.

Their large business is involved with contracting, construction, municipal areas as well as a signage shop. They operate from 3 locations in North Jutland.

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The recent owner of 22 x MF tractors was really proud to show its new contingent of Massey Ferguson tractors. In fact, the new AGCO partner used to be a New Holland customer for many years, and Bejstrup has decided to replace its NH fleet. Their future challenge is to aim for more AGCO products at Bejstrup – tractors and balers.

This successful story is due to the strong relationships built by AGCO Denmark as well as the Key accounts team and the local dealer, Hjallerup Maskinforretning.

Per Kold Kristiansen said “We can only confirm again that we have felt welcome at AGCO in general, and dialogue and trade negotiations to date have been characterized by a positive spirit and a quick response to various questions from our side. It has obviously been one of our toughest decisions to switch from New Holland to Massey Ferguson but high praise to all of you, for having made this process very smooth. This is especially something the drivers have noticed; also after the deal has taken place, we (Bejstrup) are taken seriously. All in all, we have only positive things to say.”

The Bejstrup team is so proud of its new tractors that the drivers have their name on the door and they NEVER wear dirty boots in the cab.

Matteo Bartolini President of CEJA looks at the prospects for simplification of the CAP.

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MF: Why do we need a simplification of the Common Agricultural Policy (CAP)?

MB: The CAP is one of the European Union’s most far-reaching, complicated and intricate policies. More importantly, it is one of the EU’s most ‘common’ policies, spanning different geographical areas, landscapes, soil types and farming traditions. Not only that, but it is a policy which provides different amounts of income support to every single eligible farmer in the Union. This, understandably, makes it a lengthy and complex policy which can sometimes cause administrative burden for Member States, businesses and individual farmers. Therefore, it is essential that CAP Simplification is explored extensively. Now that the new CAP has been in place since the beginning of the year, the EU institutions want to look through what has been agreed and where improvements can be made, as well as what can be done better next time.

MF: What is the background to CAP simplification?

MB: The European Commissioner for Agriculture and Rural Development, Phil Hogan, has identified CAP Simplification as one of his priorities for 2015. This is also in the context of the new Commission’s Work Programme, headed up by Commission President Juncker, which highlights ‘Better Regulation’ as a core objective for EU policy. A first action plan on CAP Simplification was published in 2006, and since then there has been an ongoing CAP Simplification exercise. At the outset, the exercise will focus mostly on delegated and implementing acts, which help to put in place the detailed rules needed to implement the reformed CAP. Commissioner Hogan has already said that he will review the rules on environmental focus areas among more than 200 other Commission regulations that will be considered for simplification.

To read the full article please click here

Massey Ferguson: Trouble-Free Emissions

Meeting increasingly stringent EPA standards can be difficult enough, without adding frequent maintenance. Fortunately, Massey Ferguson’s emissions system maintenance is practically trouble-free on all midsize and high-horsepower tractors, reducing downtime and expense, especially compared to competitive designs.

In most cases, the emissions systems need no maintenance at all.

In most cases, the emissions systems need no maintenance at all.

“First of all, the 4600, 5600 and 6600 series tractors don’t have a diesel particulate filter (DPF) that needs to be cleaned through a regeneration process or replaced at certain intervals,” says Brandon Montgomery, AGCO product manager for Massey Ferguson GC1700-6600 series tractors. Regeneration generates excessive heat, which can be a hazard, but new filters can cost up to $2,000 to replace and even $1,500 to clean.

“Instead, Massey Ferguson 4600 Series tractors are equipped with only an exhaust gas recirculation (EGR) system, high pressure common rail (HPCR) and a diesel oxidation catalyst (DOC) designed to last for the life of the tractor. The same goes for the MF5609 and MF5610 models, which use the same emission technology.

“Even the larger Massey Ferguson series, like the 6600 and the 5600 large-frame models, require nothing more than filling the DEF tank,” Montgomery adds, noting that these models incorporate a diesel oxidation catalyst in combination with a second-generation selective catalytic reduction (SCR) system. “Even then, Massey Ferguson’s variable DEF [diesel exhaust fluid] injection and real-time exhaust monitoring system allow our engines to consume less DEF over time, saving money and refueling downtime.”

The fact that Massey Ferguson doesn’t use a DPF on its midsize tractors is particularly appealing to producers who use smaller tractors in poultry houses, or to pull wagons or sprayers in fruit and vegetable operations.

“Most of those applications are performed at low speeds,” he explains. “However, low engine speeds generate exhaust particulates even faster.”

“The fact that all but the very smallest Massey Ferguson tractors don’t use a DPF is huge,” Montgomery continues. “In most cases, the emissions system requires absolutely no maintenance. That not only saves time and fuel, but reduces the intense heat that builds in the exhaust system during the filter regeneration process.”

For more, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/advantage/massey-ferguson-trouble-free-emissions/.

Taking Care: Craig Holm and His Minnesota Farm

Craig Holm likes to mix things up on his farm in Southern Minnesota. Raising corn and beans on about 2,500 acres, he also runs a custom application business—last year spraying about 10,000 acres—and finishes about 9,000 hogs each year on contract.

Holm, 45, says he’s diversified in part because he saw opportunities, but also because he figured commodity prices would eventually soften. “It’s just the cycle,” he says, a lesson, along with many others, he learned from his father, who was also a farmer, as well as his mother, Sally, who still works with him on a semi-retired basis.

Those lessons have served as a foundation, Holm says, upon which he’s added new technologies and practices. For instance, he injects into the soil some 1 million gallons of hog manure from his finishing operation. As a result, he says he gets about 15 to 20 bushels more of corn per acre than if he’d used conventional fertilizer.

Holm has also re-introduced an older method of planting beans—with a grain drill. With the beans planted closer together, he says, “we get the canopy on, so weeds can’t push through, they don’t come up … and 99% of the fields are picture-perfect clean.” He got some 5 bushels more per acre this past harvest as compared to recent years not using the grain drill.

Holm is always looking for an edge, some new practice or technology that can help on his farm, but only those that offer a solid return. Another such leg up has been his Massey Ferguson® and other AGCO equipment.

“They’re second to nothing, that’s for sure,” says Holm, who runs a variety of Massey Ferguson machines, including a combine and three tractors. He also owns Sunflower, White Planters™ and a RoGator® from AGCO.

“The fuel efficiencies are amazing on these new machines,” he says, but without compromising on power and capacity. “These new engines are set up to use the power that they need, but the computers back them down,” says Holm, allowing the engine to run at optimum rpm and thereby reduce fuel consumption.

Speaking of his MF9560 combine, Holm says, “I couldn’t believe how fast we went through harvest last fall … for that combine to do a 300-acre day is really not even a hard day. It was so impressive.”

So much so that his two agronomy consultants, both of whom rode with him, as well as farmers who run other brands, declared it the best of the lot. “They said the other brands out there don’t compare.”

Holm is a willing but cautious adaptor of innovative machinery and other solutions. “I will use the technology if I think I can make it pay,” he says.

For more, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/taking-care-craig-holm-and-his-minnesota-farm/.

AGCO’s Jackson Plant: Better, Stronger, Faster

Imagine taking a brand-new tractor, worth tens of thousands of dollars, and purposefully trying to break it. That’s what the folks at the AGCO manufacturing facility in Jackson, Minn., do just about every workday.

It all happens at Jackson’s Quality Gate Five. The $1.97 million-facility can hold and check two tractors at once, one on the “jounce” and PTO testing station, and the other on a chassis dynamometer.

For the jounce test, a tractor’s rear wheels or tracks are positioned on pads that rock back and forth. This test is used to verify that there are no loose fittings, hoses or electrical connections. Afterward, the tractor is physically inspected to make sure nothing came loose as a result of the shaking, which is so violent no one is allowed to be in the cab.

While still at the first station, the PTO is tested at various speed and load levels, and its output measured across the rpm range. Each tractor is then moved to the second station and the chassis dynamometer. Here, a multi-roller bed is used to verify different functions like the steering, brake, transmission shift quality, DEF functionality and limited powertrain performance.

Six winches hold the tractors in place as they speed up to 33 mph and rev to as high as 400 HP. The dynamometer reads the engine rpm, what gear it’s in and how well it shifts, and when it shifts, how low the rpm goes.

“What we learn,” says Eric Fisher, the plant’s director of operations, “also affects what we do upstream.”

Overall, according to Fisher, the work in Gate Five takes about two hours, and includes 250-plus tests and the analysis of more than 150,000 data points. In just the first month of operation, the inspections, he says, “yielded a 25% reduction in defects, and that’s just a start.”

“Like its customers, AGCO doesn’t embrace technology for its own sake,” says Bob Crain, AGCO Senior Vice President and General Manager, Americas. “There must be a return on investment.”

The expansion and upgrades at the Jackson plant, as well as those throughout the company’s global facilities, offer just that, says Crain, “in the company’s relentless pursuit of its stated goal—to be No. 1 in customer-perceived quality.”

For more on the Jackson plant’s best-in-class quality assurance facilities, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/advantage/agcos-jackson-plant-better-stronger-faster/.

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