Share & Subscribe
Topics
Archives
Brands
 

Expedition South – Conserving Sir Edmund Hillary’s Antarctic Hut

Massey Ferguson is proudly supporting another great adventure! The New Zealand Antarctic Heritage Trust’s #ExpeditionSouth, is an initiative to raise $1 million dollars for the conservation of Sir Edmund Hillary’s Hut on Antarctica’s Ross Island.

Hillary’s Hut A was the first building constructed at Scott Base and is where Sir Ed began his historic expedition to the South Pole in 1958 with the assistance of three TE20 Ferguson tractors.

Sir Edmund Hillary revisits his Scott Base hut.

Sir Edmund Hillary revisits his Scott Base hut.

Nearly 60 years on, Hillary’s hut is in a state of disrepair and a comprehensive conservation plan has been developed in order to save a valuable slice of New Zealand’s history –  but they need your help to make it happen!

In a tribute to Hillary’s 2012 kilometres journey, a team of drivers will raise awareness of the campaign as they embark on a journey traversing New Zealand on three tractors – two of them the same Ferguson TE-20 tractor models used by Hillary’s team, the other – a modern MF5600 Antarctica2, based on the MF5610 series used by “Tractor Girl” Manon Ossevort’s 2014/15 Antarctic2 tractor expedition.

Sir Edmund Hillary on a Ferguson TE20 during the original 1958 Expedition

Sir Edmund Hillary on a Ferguson TE20 during the original 1958 Expedition

 

#ExpeditionSouth will harness that intrepid spirit of the original journey, travelling the highways and back roads of New Zealand, visiting Hillary “hotspots” throughout NZ as well as local schools. Along the journey, local NZ Massey Ferguson dealers will make sure the team and their tractors are well looked after as they raise awareness of the Heritage Trust’s important conservation goals.

Antarctic Heritage Trust Director Nigel Watson says Sir Ed’s original decision to go to the South Pole was a bold move.

“No-one had been overland since Captain Scott in 1912. Sir Ed was on the Ice supporting the Trans-Antarctic Expedition, and his decision to push on to the Pole with three Ferguson tractors was controversial. But of course they made it – the first trip overland to the South Pole by motor vehicle.”

The #expeditionsouth team and their trusty machines.

The #expeditionsouth and their trusty machines.

Piha Beach (one of Sir Ed’s favourite places) marks the starting point of the team’s journey that will finish just below Hillary Ridge at Aoraki on Mt Cook. While not having to face the icy conditions of Antarctica, the team will face a four week journey through a variety of changeable conditions across New Zealand’s north and south island that will test both the drivers and their machines.

“We’re very pleased to have Massey Ferguson on board with us and supporting such a valuable and worthwhile cause. The brand has a very strong connection with Sir Ed that stems back to his original expedition to the South Pole,” says Nigel.

 

#expeditionsouth

#MasseyFerguson

www.facebook.com/MasseyFergusonGlobal

www.masseyferguson.com.au

www.expeditionsouth.nz

AGCO and SDI: More Power, Less Compaction

Nate Ray has some 25,000 hungry mouths to feed—all of them the bovine beauties at De Jager Farms’ eight dairies in California’s Central Valley. Specifically, Ray oversees operations on De Jager’s 17,000 acres of farmland, most of which is used to grow corn, wheat and alfalfa.

Over the years, Ray has helped introduce new practices at the farm, including subsurface drip irrigation (SDI). Yet, as is often the case, one change begets another, as when the use of SDI created an even greater need to reduce compaction.

Ray found the solution in the form of a Challenger® MT865E. “We chose this Challenger track machine for our minimum-tillage operations,” says Ray, “and basically it was to reduce our compaction and just to give us more power to the ground that we weren’t getting with our John Deere machines. The Challenger,” which he says has also reduced fuel usage, has “provided more torque, more pulling power and greater efficiency.”

Ray and De Jager also recently switched to AGCO windrowers. “Over the course of two years,” says Ray, “we tried out just about every brand on the market, from New Holland to John Deere to MacDon to Case, and we pretty much fell in love with the AGCO machines.”

In the course of making the change—to two Challenger and two Massey Ferguson® WR9760 self-propelled windrowers—Ray was also able to actually reduce the number of windrowers from six, while making the seven to eight cuttings of alfalfa per year on the same acreage in less time and using less fuel. What’s more, he says, the quality of the cutting is “on par, if not better, with the AGCO rotary heads.”

As for his AGCO dealership, “We’ve been working with Holt of California for about four years now, and their service has been excellent. Their expertise and knowledge of the machines has enabled us to run them to their maximum performance. And we’ve just had a great working relationship with them. They’ve provided excellent customer support.”

For more, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/going-underground-irrigation-breakthroughs-in-drought-stricken-california/.

Spectacular pageant of 70 tractors marks 70th anniversary of the Coventry produced Ferguson TE20

Massey Ferguson reports that enthusiastic crowds turned out to see the historic ’70 Tractors for 70 Years’ parade through the streets of the City of Coventry on 30 July.

 

The cavalcade and display of machines old and new was staged by Culture Coventry to celebrate the 70th anniversary of the start of production of the iconic Ferguson TE20 tractor. In July 1946, the first Ferguson TE20 tractor, affectionately known as the ‘Little Grey Fergie’, rolled off the assembly line at its former Banner Lane manufacturing plant in Coventry in the UK. The tractor was the brainchild of engineer and inventor, Harry Ferguson, a founder of the present-day Massey Ferguson, one of the world’s foremost   producers of farm machinery for global markets.

’70 Tractors for 70 Years’ parade through the streets of the City of Coventry on 30 July.

’70 Tractors for 70 Years’ parade through the streets of the City of Coventry on 30 July.

The tractors for the event were brought together by the Friends of Ferguson Heritage Club. Led by a 20.3hp 1947 Ferguson TE20, equipped with a 2-furrow plough, and the mighty 400hp MF 8737 – the most powerful tractor in the current Massey Ferguson line-up – the procession wound its way through Coventry finishing at Millennium Place outside the Transport Museum. Unusually, it was not the familiar Massey Ferguson red livery for the MF 8737. Instead, it had been especially prepared by Massey Ferguson with striking black paintwork – paying homage to the prototype Ferguson Black tractor of 1933 which was the first to incorporate Harry Ferguson’s pioneering ideas for a three-point linkage system to connect tractor and implement.  In a tribute to the manufacturing legacy of the Banner Lane plant, Massey Ferguson named the black MF 8737 the ‘City of Coventry’. Seated in the cab for the duration of the parade was the Lord Mayor of Coventry, Councillor Lindsley Harvard.

Lord Mayor of Coventry, Councillor Lindsley Harvard, seated in the black ‘City of Coventry’ MF 8737.

Lord Mayor of Coventry, Councillor Lindsley Harvard, seated in the black ‘City of Coventry’ MF 8737.

“It was a marvellous event and wonderful to see this pageant celebrating the brilliant engineering of the Ferguson TE20 which changed the world of farm mechanisation.” says Campbell Scott, Massey Ferguson Director Marketing Services (who himself drove a 1949 TEA20 tractor in the blue livery of Brighton Corporation).  “We are so proud of this superb legacy of practical and innovative technology which continues to inspire our design engineers and is at the heart of Massey Ferguson’s 21st century mission to produce straightforward, dependable equipment to increase the efficiency and productivity of farmers all over the world. Today, more than 200,000 tractors bearing our famous Massey Ferguson ‘Triple Triangle’ brand are built every year for global markets.”

Tractors taking part in the pageant showcased a wide range of Ferguson, Massey-Harris and Massey Ferguson machines produced since 1946. The tractor coming from furthest afield for the event was a 1949 Ferguson TEA20 fitted with half-track equipment which travelled nearly 200 miles from Exeter in Devon. From much closer to home was a 2015 MF 5610 Dyna-4 on turf tyres based in Finham, Coventry. A beautifully-restored, prize-winning MF 65 industrial tractor painted in the requisite yellow from Skipton, Yorkshire represented the non-agricultural ranges.

’70 Tractors for 70 Years’ parade through the streets of the City of Coventry on 30 July.

’70 Tractors for 70 Years’ parade through the streets of the City of Coventry on 30 July.

Over half a million Ferguson TE20 tractors (Tractor England) were built at the Banner Lane plant between 6 July 1946 and 13 July 1956.  Key to the global success of the tractor was its unique three-point linkage implement attachment system controlled by the tractor’s hydraulics. Designated the ‘Ferguson System,’ this effectively turned the tractor and implement into a single working unit, replacing the previous cumbersome trailed method of implement operation.

Massey Ferguson is a leading global farm machinery brand producing a full-line range of tractors, harvesting equipment and agricultural implements. Its well-known red-liveried equipment is distributed in 140 countries.

Established in 1994, The Friends of Ferguson Heritage Club has over 5000 members worldwide who are dedicated to all things Ferguson, Massey Ferguson and Massey Harris.

The Ferguson TE20’s 70th anniversary inspired Culture Coventry’s current ‘Tractors – From Factory to Field’ exhibition at Coventry Transport Museum (runs until 19 September) and the public display of the Daniel Massey Bronze Sculpture at the city’s Herbert Museum and Art Gallery. Culture Coventry manages three of Coventry’s major visitor attractions including Coventry Transport Museum, Herbert Museum and Art Gallery and the Lunt Roman Fort.

Celebrations for a Production Milestone

67,000th combine harvester to be manufactured at AGCO Breganze plant in Italy is a Massey Ferguson BETA 7370.

Massey Ferguson is celebrating production of the 67,000th combine harvester at AGCO’s Breganze Manufacturing Facility in northern Italy.

MF Beta 7370, the 67,000th combine harvester to be manufactured at the Breganze plant in Italy

MF Beta 7370, the 67,000th combine harvester to be manufactured at the Breganze plant in Italy

The 67,000th machine to roll off the assembly line is a 360hp MF BETA 7370 combine destined for work in Sweden.

The 25ha Breganze site is AGCO’s Harvesting Centre of Excellence and produces a full range of MF combine harvesters suitable for small farmers through to the high-capacity models required by large-scale agribusiness customers. Along with the MF BETA combine, these include the MF ACTIVA, MF ACTIVA S, MF CENTORA and MF DELTA.

The MF BETA 7370 taking the title of 67,000th combine is bound for Massey Ferguson Dealer GH:s Traktorcity in Östergötland, Sweden.

“Massey Ferguson combines have had a highly successful year in Sweden seeing a doubling in the number of units sold,” explains Adam Sherriff, Market Development Manager, Massey Ferguson Harvesting. “The MF BETA 7370 is our best-selling combine model in the country and features the acclaimed Skyline cab which provides excellent visibility, ergonomically-positioned controls and superb comfort to make the operator’s job easier and more productive.”

Multi-million dollar investments in recent years have transformed the AGCO Breganze plant into a world-class site. Certified to ISO standards, some of the most recent developments at the 65,000 m2 factory have seen a complete reorganisation of the supply chain and production process, the installation of new rolling and panelling machines, robot welding automated systems, a state-of-the art paint-shop and the opening of the magnificent AgriDome Visitors Centre.

Massey Ferguson combines have been in production at Breganze site since 2004. In June 2007, this partnership was further strengthened when AGCO acquired a 50% stake in Breganze-based Laverda S.p.A from the Italian Argo Group. AGCO fully acquired the plant in 2010 bringing over 50 years of combine manufacturing experience in Italy into the AGCO family. The current site was opened in 1979.

Find out more about AGCO’s Breganze Manufacturing Facility

Shepherd’s Grain: Bridges Built, Alliances Forged

Started in 2002 by two Washington state producers, Shepherd’s Grain now includes about 60 wheat growers, mainly in the Northwestern U.S., with a few growers located as far away as Southern California and the Canadian Prairie. Although they’ve begun offering some of the milled grain at the retail level, the vast majority of what the group sells is to bakeries in Portland and Seattle. In 2015, the Shepherd’s Grain farmers produced a total of 673,000 bushels of wheat, a growth of about 720% since 2005.

“It really started,” says Mike Moran, the Shepherd’s Grain general manager, “when a lot of growers in our region realized that the way that the land had been farmed over the last few decades was not sustainable long term. In fact, because of wind and water erosion, particularly in the hilly areas of the Palouse, they were losing topsoil at a rate that meant that their families wouldn’t be able to continue to farm there if they kept doing what they were doing.”

To combat the losses, as well as improve soil health, Shepherd’s Grain farmers often work together, sharing information on what’s worked for them and what hasn’t. As a result, many have minimized, if not eliminated, tillage. For instance, Garry Esser and his son John use rotational and cover crops, and say they only till the ground every three to six years, unlike their previous practice of churning up the ground almost annually.

In addition to farming methods, Shepherd’s Grain also promotes a business model that is sustainable. Selling to bakeries via longer-term contracts, the group of farmers not only forge business relationships, but build bridges between different groups of people who often do not have much contact with each other.

“It’s really about … connecting farmers with consumers … and without that,” continues Moran, “we wouldn’t have that information flow from the consumer back to the farmer, and on the other side, really helping the consumer understand all of the complexity of farming.”

“The end users who have bought into Shepherd’s Grain have done so for a variety of reasons,” says John Esser, a Challenger customer who recently became a partner with his dad. “But I’d say at the top of the list is they’ve loved the relationship that they have with the growers.

“You know, for so many people, you go to the store, you buy bread, you go home, you eat it. Nobody really connects the farmer to the bread,” continues the younger Esser. “Shepherd’s Grain offers an opportunity for people to know the information behind where their food comes from.”

For more about how AGCO customers are involved with Shepherd’s Grain from our exclusive customer magazine, FarmLife, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/shepherds-grain-bridges-built-alliances-forged/.

VISIT MASSEY WEBSITE

Visit the Massey Ferguson Website
Find a Dealer AGCO
Find a Dealer
FUSE TECHNOLOGIES IMAGE
Visit our Technology Page
SEEDING TILLAGE IMAGE
Visit our Technology Page
Join Us on Facebook
Join Us on Twitter
Videos