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Protect Your Farm From Fire

Believe it or not, but winter is a very common season for fires due to the use of additional heat sources. Fire can be particularly destructive on the farm. From property to lives, take a few steps to prevent it from happening to you.

Children, especially age 5 and under, are at the greatest risk of home fire-related death and injury. Young children don’t know what to do and are likely to panic in a fire. They may hide in a closet or behind a bed instead of escaping. Practice fire drills at home once a year. Show your children all of the safe ways to escape a fire from every room of the house and every building on the farm. Designate a meeting place outside and make it part of the drill. One way to prevent fires in the house is to install smoke detectors. There should be a smoke detector on every level and outside bedrooms.

Fire extinguishers are essential items on the farm in case a fire breaks out. Besides the house, keep fire extinguishers in barns, other farm buildings, and machinery including tractors and combines. The local fire department is a terrific resource as well. Ask them to help you start the process of protecting your farm from fire. Both you and the fire department will be better prepared if a fire should occur.

And follow these fire safety precautions on the farm:

  • Test smoke detectors once a month and replace the batteries twice a year (when you change your clocks for daylight savings).
  • Replace smoke detectors that are ten years of age or older.
  • Place proper fire extinguishers in strategic locations, making sure they are accessible.
  • Get training on how to use fire extinguishers.
  • Plan your escape routes.
  • Designate one place outside where family members should meet in case of fire.
  • Keep matches away from children.
  • Don’t enter a confined livestock area or housing structure if it catches on fire.
  • Install lightning rods.
  • Store gasoline and other flammable fuels in proper containers in a cool place.
  • Turn off engines when refueling machines.
*This post was submitted by Tracy Schlater, Marketing Director from Farm Safety 4 Just Kids

AGCO’s Support of FFA Collegiate Scholarship Program

AGCO is a proud supporter of the National FFA Organization and the National FFA Collegiate Scholarship Program. During the 2012-2013 FFA scholarship year, AGCO and 60 local Challenger, Massey Ferguson and Gleaner dealers will distribute a total of 120 scholarships in the amount of $1,000 each. The local scholarship program which AGCO launched in 2011 has seen tremendous support from dealers with four new dealerships joining the effort for the 2012-13 scholarship year.

“Our dealership has supported FFA in Idaho since the business was founded in 1990. We do so because FFA is a program that addresses the agricultural interests of young people in our communities, many of whom are going to be our top farm operators and customers in the future,” says Cleve Buttars, president/CEO, Agri-Service, a participating dealership headquartered in Twin Falls, Idaho. “AGCO couldn’t have chosen a better agricultural youth organization to support. The company’s sponsorship of local scholarships fits in perfectly with what we were already doing, giving us an additional opportunity to support these youngsters through college.”

On a national level AGCO will distribute 12 scholarships and AGCO Finance will distribute six scholarships in the amount of $2,000 each. The 2013 Scholarship application process opens online November 15, 2012, and applications must be submitted by 5:00 p.m. EST February 15, 2013. For more details on the scholarship program and a list of participating dealerships offering local scholarships, visit www.ffa.org/scholarships.

“The young men and women involved in FFA are the future of the agricultural industry and are the key to feeding the world whether they return to the family farm after college or get involved with other areas of agriculture,” says Jason Marx, vice president of marketing at AGCO. “We salute FFA for its fine work and are proud to be a part of the National FFA Collegiate Scholarship Program that recognizes and supports these students.” Through the FFA scholarship program Massey Ferguson, Challenger, and Gleaner dealers financially support students through post secondary school to help launch their careers in the agricultural industry. “Agriculture constantly faces new challenges and provides new opportunities, and these scholarship recipients are the future of our industry, thanks in part to the role FFA has played in their lives,” says Marx.

AGCO is one of FFA’s longest-standing sponsors with 2012 representing 67 years of support. During this time, AGCO has provided more than $1.2 million dollars in support of FFA, with individual dealers contributing in addition. Supporting the scholarship program is just one way the company and its employees express their appreciation for FFA and today’s youth. AGCO’s corporate involvement also includes the National FFA Convention in Indianapolis, Ind., and has a recruiting presence at the Collegiate Career Fair. Marx mentions that many AGCO employees credit FFA with helping them to develop their own skills and lifelong interest in agriculture.

Students receiving scholarships through the National FFA Collegiate Scholarship program are selected based on leadership they have shown in their schools and communities as well as academic performance. Planned majors include engineering, communications, education, business management and economics. Supervised agricultural experience programs and future goals are also taken into consideration. FFA members are trained in leadership, goal setting, consensus building, and problem solving. These students are not afraid to work and know what it means to make a profit. Collectively, FFA members earn $4 billion annually through their hands-on work experience.

For more information about AGCO and its products, visit www.AGCOcorp.com.

11th Massey Ferguson Journalism Award awards the best Brazilian and South American agribusiness work pieces

On the evening of October 4, in a ceremony at Casa Vetro, in Porto Alegre-RS, the winners of the Massey Ferguson Journalism Award 2012 were announced.  The event gathered journalists from all over Brazil who stood out for their commitment and quality in publishing news on South American and Brazilian agribusiness, as well as media professionals of Rio Grande do Sul and executives of Massey Ferguson and AGCO.

During the ceremony the senior vice president and general manager of AGCO for South America, André Carioba, and the marketing director of AGCO, Fábio Piltcher, highlighted the record of submissions in 2012: 287 work pieces. They also spoke about the challenge of breaking barriers in the journalism specialized in agribusiness. “Social networks work today with the immediacy of information, so journalists have strong competition and need to make use not only of originality, but also of the creative ability to keep journalism alive and interesting to the reader,” said Fabio Piltcher.

“The first edition of the Award had only 34 entries. In 2012, there was almost 300. The goal at the time was to honor the talent and dedication of media professionals that recorded the history of Brazilian agriculture,” Carioba recalls. “Today, the pieces submitted go beyond that; they bring information on technology to improve field activities, update farmers on the global agricultural scenario, how this scenario will impact their business and how some experiences may facilitate their work, besides adding value to the product and consequently to the farmer’s business,” concluded the executive.

The finalists stood out for their originality of theme, research, argumentation, relevance for agribusiness, structure and even interactivity in the case of Internet use. “The pieces submitted presented very high standard, I followed other editions of the Award and it is noticeable that journalists have been increasingly engaged year after year,” said Carlos Henrique Carvalho, head of the panel and executive president of the Brazilian Association of Communication Agencies (ABRACOM).

“We appreciate the participation of all journalists that allowed the record number of entries this year. We congratulate everyone for the effort, dedication and contribution to Brazilian agribusiness,” concluded Eduardo Nunes, manager of marketing and communications of AGCO for South America.

São Paulo topped the ranking of states with the highest number of submissions, 37%, followed by Rio Grande do Sul with 18%, and in third place Goiás with 9% of the journalists who competed for the R$10 thousand prizes.

Get to know now the winners of the Massey Ferguson Journalism Award 2012:

Internet Category

Andriolli de Brites da Costa from Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (MS), with the work “History of the Breed: Nellore” published on the portal Rural Centro on July 8, 2011.

Photography Category

Valdemir Magalhães Cunha from São Paulo(SP), with the work “Late Cocoa” Globo Rural magazine published on November 20, 2011.

Newspaper Category

Luiz Silveira from São Paulo (SP), with the work “Agriculture seeks a way out to keep pace with productivity” published in the Brasil Econômico newspaper on February 21, 2012.

Magazine Category

Denise Sauressig from Porto Alegre (RS) with the work “Management, The rural business in good hands” published in the magazine A Granja on September 1st, 2012.

TV Category

Cesar Dassié from São Paulo (SP) with the work “Rural roads”, shown in the program Globo Rural, at Globo on March 20.

Students Category

Thaís Bianchin Goes from Nuporanga (SP) with the work “Organic Coffee: from crop to cup – Challenge and passion in the art of producing very special grains” published on July 7, 2011.

Mercosul Category

Roderick Mac Lean from Buenos Aires, Argentina, with the work “Las huellas de los alimentos” published on the blog Faros Largos on July 8,2011.

National Farm Safety and Health Week

National Farm Safety and Health Week is the week of September 16th. What a great time to talk about safety on your farm.

Have you ever had a close call on your farm? Something that could have ended very differently. How many of you know a family member, friend, or neighbor who got hurt working on a farm? Do any of you have the heavy heart that comes from knowing someone who died on the farm? Most farmers will point out their scars and tell the story of their close call(s) amongst each other. Usually in context, they’re no more than stories with a plot line, a climax, and hopefully – a happy ending. Very real people become characters in a tale. This week, tell your story. The whole story. How much worse could it have been? How much was the hospital bill? How much time did you miss working? How much money did you lose as a result of the lost production? How did getting hurt impact your family, your kids? And most importantly Did you change anything because of it? Make it personal, because the person listening needs to know it’s more than just a story. You’re real. Accidents… are real. And sometimes, they’re preventable. September 16-22 is National Farm Safety and Health Week. Use your story to tell at least two others about farm safety this week and share them on Twitter using #FSHW12 and Facebook.

*This post was submitted by Tracy Schlater, Marketing Director from Farm Safety 4 Just Kids

 

Happy International Youth Day!


 

When looking to build a better future for our world, it is only practical that we consider our world’s youth. Plain and simple, the youth of the world are the world’s future. In December of 1999, the United Nations officially declared August 12th as International Youth Day(IYD).

IYD seeks to highlight good practices in developing and expanding successful partnerships with people. This year’s theme is “Building a better world—partnering with our youth.” The UN is encouraging organizations to form partnerships with the youth. Some encouraged areas of partnership are employment, education, and entrepreneurship.

This summer, I was given an opportunity to intern with AGCO from May to early August.

As my final week as an intern comes to a close, I have had some time to look back on my experience with the internship program. In doing this, I have been able to reflect upon what the program meant to myself and the other interns. Whether it is your first time holding a job, or if you have been in the corporate setting before, the AGCO internship program gives you a chance to better understand the synergies between business, education and employment. My time as an intern has been a great experience. With access to various people and resources, it has given me a hands-on opportunity to apply my education and further develop the skills I will need to be successful in the labor force, and add value to my community.
Partnerships such as the one AGCO has with its interns are instrumental in providing youth with continued education and development. The boys and girls that compose our world’s youth today will eventually be the men and women making our world’s biggest decisions. This is why it is important that they receive support from people and organizations globally.
The U.N wants to hear your thoughts and recommendations about effective ways to support our young people. If you want to offer your thoughts or share your success stories, email them at youth@un.org!

 

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