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Massey Ferguson MF 4700 Series cab tractors set the new multi-purpose tractor benchmark

Three new models in the Massey Ferguson MF 4700 Series are the first standard farm tractors for generations, from any manufacturer, which have been developed specifically for the demanding 75hp to 100hp sector.

Fitted with cabs and offering powers of 75hp, 85hp and 95hp, the brand new MF 4700 Series tractors are purpose designed and built for the 75hp to 100hp sector, featuring the most up to date engine, transmission, cab and driveline technology.


“Designed by engineers in Massey Ferguson’s Beauvais facility, the MF 4700 Series are not only completely new tractors, they also introduce an entirely original concept in modern tractor development,” says Campbell Scott, Director, Marketing Services.

“The MF 4700 Series are the first, and only, tractors available that have been totally designed in the 21st Century to deliver the straightforward, rugged and reliable operation for users in the 75hp to 130hp sector.

“They not only introduce modern technology to this size of tractor for the first time, but they are also purpose-built for this important sector. And, of course, they benefit from over half a Century of Massey Ferguson’s experience of producing pioneering, straightforward and dependable tractors,” he adds.

The MF 4700 Series offers best in class comfort and control from a completely new, spacious, air-conditioned cab built in the new Beauvais 2 facility. The cab is equipped to the highest specifications providing the most modern features and controls in the sector.

All the new tractors are powered by the latest technology AGCO Power 3.3 litre, three cylinder engines. Well proven in other Massey Ferguson tractors, these efficient engines deliver high power and torque with exceptional economy and meet the strict Stage IV/Tier 4 regulations with maintenance free Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) technology.

An engine speed memory is standard and is activated by simply pressing a button in the cab.

Massey Ferguson has developed an efficient 12 x 12 mechanical gearbox specifically for the MF 4700 Series. This is equipped with a synchronised reverse shuttle, with hydraulic clutch activation for easy shifting as standard.

The renowned Powershuttle control lever is an option that provides finger-tip direction changes and comes with a button on the gear lever to activate the clutch. This is similar to that used on larger Massey Ferguson tractors and comes with Comfort Control to allow operators to adjust the sensitivity of the shift.

Four-wheel drive is provided by a centre-mounted shaft tucked neatly under the centre of the gearbox and engine. It is engaged electro-hydraulically and is disengaged automatically at speeds more than 14km/hr and activated again as speeds drop.

All the new tractors are equipped with a new open-centre hydraulic system. This uses a tandem pump to supply the pressure and flow required to operate the latest implements.

The powerful three point linkage’s 3,000kg lift capacity handles modern implements with ease. The modern, well-proven electronic linkage control (ELC) system is operated by a convenient ‘mouse’, which fits neatly into the hand and provides straightforward and efficient operation.

The MF 4700 Series make ideal loader tractors and are fully compatible with the Massey Ferguson 900 and 900X ranges, which offer a wide choice of lift capacity, height and controls.

CEJA column, Issue 21, Nov 2015

In this month’s regular column from CEJA – the European Council of Young Farmers – we caught up with Alan Jagoe, the organisation’s recently-elected new President to tell us more about himself, his vision for young farmers and the role of CEJA.

Alan Jagoe

Alan Jagoe

MF: Congratulations on your appointment! Can you tell us a little about your background?

AJ: Thank you! I’m delighted and honoured to be elected to the role and to be able to continue the great work of my predecessor, Matteo Bartolini. I’ve been a CEJA Vice-President for the last two years and worked closely with Matteo during that time. Prior to that, I was President of the Macra na Feirme, the Irish Young Farmers organisation. As for my agricultural interests, I run a 200 ha farm in County Cork, Ireland focused on dairy and cereals.

MF: What drew you to the Young Farmers’ movement and why is it important?

AJ: As with most people, for me, it started with the desire to enjoy the social aspect – the fellowship, trying new things, going to new places, having new experiences. Then it moved on from there when I became involved on the policy side and the drive to get a good deal for young farmers.  It is absolutely crucial that we have a strong and vibrant young farmer organisation. We are priming our members to be future farming leaders and the movement gives them the opportunity to experience everything that this entails.

To read the full article, please click here.

Cold Water, Hot Debate

There’s been considerable controversy over just how much of California’s freshwater the state’s agriculture industry actually uses. Is it 40%, 80% or somewhere in between? Here’s how the percentages are calculated, so you can decide for yourself.

Irrigation water runs along a dried-up ditch between rice farms to provide water for the fields in Richvale, Calif.

Irrigation water runs along a dried-up ditch between rice farms to provide water for the fields in Richvale, Calif.

The amount of freshwater used by California farms and other agricultural operations is often reported at 80%, with the remaining 20% allocated for urban use. (A third division of usage—industrial—is typically included in the “urban” and “agricultural” categories.) However, the key word here is “available.”

To reach the 80% figure listed above, only water that’s available or “developed” for economic uses is taken into account. When environmental needs for freshwater are entered into the equation, the breakdown is roughly 50% environmental, 40% agricultural and 10% urban, this according to numbers reported by the Public Policy Institute of California.

Yet, even the latter numbers—those accounting for environmental usage—are contested. Splitting the difference, UC Davis’s Center for Watershed Sciences argues that while many environmental uses should be included in the state’s total water budget, wild and scenic rivers should not, because it is not possible for them to provide water for human use. This reconfiguration renders state freshwater usage as 62% agricultural, 22% environmental and 16% urban.

Need another opinion? Blaine Hanson of UC Davis offers one that considers the variance in precipitation: only 52% of California’s total water supply (not just that developed for economic uses) is used by agriculture in a dry year, and only 29% is used in a wet year.

For more on water shortages and means to overcome them, see the FarmLife™ special report, “Water for a Thirsty, and Hungry, World.”

AGCO Testifies on Big Data in Agriculture

By Abby Burton

AGCO was invited to testify in front of the House Agriculture Committee that took place October 28, 2015. In announcing the Full Committee public hearing, Big Data and Agriculture: Innovation and Implications, Chairman K. Michael Conaway explained that the hearing would be a forum for stakeholders to explain what big data means to their business and how it is changing the agriculture marketplace.
As one of five expert witnesses, and representing the only machinery company on the panel, Matt Rushing, vice president, Global Advanced Technology Solutions (ATS) Product Line at AGCO, offered perspective into the area of agriculture data: what it is, the potential it holds for helping growers increase productivity, some challenges the industry faces and, most importantly, the exciting opportunity to help growers leverage their data effectively.Matt Testifying 2

In Rushing’s written and verbal testimony on behalf of AGCO, he explained how new, precision agriculture technologies are creating tremendous amounts of data that has so far not been utilized by most growers. Being able to harness this generated data has the potential to be the next big driver in productivity gains. Smart, connected machines and growers’ ability to effectively manage and use farm data is at the forefront of the next farming revolution. With these changes, states AGCO’s testimony, shared standards for accessing, processing and ownership of this data must be agreed upon.

The testimony highlights some challenges, and what AGCO is doing in the space. With challenges such as technical barriers and adoption, it is up to leaders in the ag industry to develop and advocate for technology that achieves a secure, standardized yet adaptable environment, and keeping data sharing choices open, so growers can use it how they want to maximize its potential. Ownership is a key piece of farm data discussion. AGCO asserts that the farmer owns and should have control and responsibility for the data generated by his or her operation. In an effort to further respect growers’ data privacy choices, AGCO has separated its data pipelines; one for machine data, and on for more sensitive agronomic data. The agronomic data pipeline is not aggregated, evaluated or stored by AGCO other than to facilitate the transfer between the machine and the software chosen by the grower.

“Agriculture data is the ultimate grower tool to minimize risk and increase profitability while enabling them to become better stewards of the land,” said Rushing in the testimony. “AGCO’s focus is on helping growers make sense of their data, and we were honored to be asked to testify representing the machinery side of the industry,” he said.

AGCO’s testimony closes in saying it is an exciting time to be a part of the agriculture industry, and calls attention to “an unprecedented level of cooperation among farmer advocacy groups, industry associations, biotech companies, equipment manufacturers and technology providers – all coming together to help growers utilize data to feed the world.”

To download a white paper of Matt Rushing’s testimony, click here.

Click here to view the recorded hearing.

For more information about Fuse, AGCO’s open approach to precision agriculture, visit

Abby Burton is a marketing communications specialist for AGCO’s Advanced Technology Solutions group, focusing on delivering the Fuse message to customers, dealers, employees and investors.

Railroads and Ag: Commodities on the Line

Mark Watne, along with his family, produces a variety of crops on 6,000 acres near Velva, N.D. The land is on the edge of the Bakken Shale oil reserves, where hydraulic fracturing has made the state the second largest oil producer after Texas and provided a shot in the arm to the North Dakota economy.

But the news hasn’t all been sunny for the region, where agricultural commodities have historically dominated transportation networks. Watne, who grows wheat, corn, soybeans, canola, barley and sunflowers, and owns two AGCO Gleaner® combines, believes in the booming grain harvests of 2013, producers were often relegated to a second priority when it came to rail transport.

The United Soybean Board estimates that shipping soybeans via rail, as opposed to by truck, saves an average of 20 to 30 cents per bushel.

The United Soybean Board estimates that shipping soybeans via rail, as opposed to by truck, saves an average of 20 to 30 cents per bushel.

“During the harvest, we could not deliver product to the elevators because they were all full,” he explains. “The rail lines weren’t picking it up.”

Overall, agricultural commodities dominate rail lines in many parts of the U.S. Agricultural traffic also relies heavily on major lines to the Mississippi River, Chicago, Kansas City and Houston.

That’s a good thing as long as rail can handle the capacity. The United Soybean Board estimates that shipping soybeans via rail, as opposed to by truck, saves an average of 20 to 30 cents per bushel. But what happens when rail can’t handle the traffic? That’s a growing concern, but one rail officials say is being addressed.

That’s critical, says Watne, who believes a viable transportation network is critical for the nation’s producers. He says the reason North American farmers still hold an advantage for exports in the Americas is because of their rail and highway systems. “Brazil may have the crops, but they don’t have this kind of infrastructure,” he explains.

“But that won’t last forever. We’re eventually going to see greater competition from countries who are developing their agricultural economies and infrastructure.”

For more on what railroads have done and plan to do to alleviate future bottlenecks, see


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