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AGCO Brands Win Big at SIMA 2015

This year’s SIMA Paris International Agri Business Show was a triumph for AGCO’s core brands. Massey Ferguson debuted two new tractors and showcased the MF 5610 tractor that journeyed to the South Pole. Challenger’s MT775E was the winner of the “Machine of the Year XXL” award. The new Fendt 300 Vario was named “Machine of the Year” in the category for tractors below 150 hp. And the new Valtra T Series won the “Machine of the Year” award in the 180–280 hp category.

Challenger_MT775E_MotY_HighRes

 

Valtra New T

SIMA is one of the largest indoor agricultural industry shows in the world. This year, the event focused on a theme of “Innovation First!” and brought together 1,700 companies from 42 countries with an emphasis on three key topics: people and territories, equipment and crops.

AGCO embraced innovations in communication by sharing this year’s SIMA experience through social media. Those who weren’t able to attend the show could follow the #AGCO25 hashtag on Twitter and Instagram, and additional news and videos can be found on the company’s social media portal created specifically for the event.

AGCO, now in its 25th year as a global leader in the agriculture industry, had a powerful presence at SIMA as an exhibitor. The company is living the “Innovation First!” concept through its cutting-edge Fuse™ Technologies — a platform that brings together machines, technology products, support, training and dealer services to ensure that farmers’ operations are optimized, coordinated and seamlessly connected through all phases of the crop cycle.

 

Workhorses: From MF135 to MF8670

For being named the 2013 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year, James Cooley received use of a Massey Ferguson® tractor for one year. He chose the MF8670, known for its continuously variable transmission (CVT), fuel efficiency and comfort.

Cooley and the MF8670

Cooley and the MF8670

It is not, however, his first Massey Ferguson. “We love Masseys,” says Cooley. “We’ve got 17 of the old 135s” used for bringing out peaches and light work. For parts, he calls on Nance Tractor and Implements in McConnells, S.C.

Adds Cooley, the vintage workhorse “was Massey’s special tractor, Daddy always said. The 135 is a tractor that everybody can drive. It’s easy to maintain regarding its parts and availability of them.”

As for his new MF8670, which Cooley calls the “Cadillac of tractors,” he plans to put it to work preparing peach and strawberry land. “We’ll use it for making the soil loose and ready for the roots to spread out on the peach trees,” he says. “And we’ll use it for fixing the ground for the strawberries.

“The view is remarkable,” continues Cooley. “It’s a smooth ride and the turning radius is remarkable. And, of course, it [has] unmatched power.”

For more on the Cooley farm, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/farmer-of-the-year-coming-out-on-top/.

Hesston by Massey Ferguson: Running Fast, Cutting Clean

A new customer had seen the clean, close cut Monte Innes, and his wife Julie, had achieved on a nearby property and realized his existing custom balers—who used equipment of a certain green color—were leaving money in the fields.

“This is the third RazorBar disc header we’ve had, and we now wouldn’t own anything else,” Monte says. “We get all the hay. It is a clean cut an inch from the ground.”

He also appreciates the speed with which the machine can travel in the field and on the highway. “It is awesome traveling down the road at 20 mph from one field to another,” he continues, noting how important that speed is when you’re working numerous scattered fields and dodging weather to get a sole cutting following a brief 70-day growing season.

The windrower is quick. “Today I cut 180 acres in six-and-a-half hours,” Monte says, “and I couldn’t have done that with any other machine.”

The Innes’ Hesston by Massey Ferguson 2170 XD baler produces bales that are denser, heavier. Because of that, Monte can now get 26 to 27 tons of hay on a semi trailer truck for shipment, rather than 22 tons.

“That saves us about 50 loads per season,” says Monte, “which saves us about $25,000 in shipping costs. “Our new baler is a home run for us.”

See Monte’s full story at http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/high-country-hay/.

AGCO Celebrates 25 Years of History, Hundreds of Years of Experience

AGCO commenced celebrating its 25th year this week at the SIMA Paris International Agri-Business Show, where visitors learned not only about the company’s past achievements, but also the principles that will help shape the equipment industry for the next 25 years.

“As a company focused entirely on agriculture, and as a global business selling and supporting products in more than 140 countries, we’re acutely aware of our responsibility to help farmers everywhere meet the productivity challenges of the future,” said Gary L. Collar, senior vice president, general manager of Asia Pacific.SIMA AGCO

AGCO is deliberately evolving from being a provider of machines and structures to being a provider of total solutions. Total farming solutions that provide more productivity, efficiency and analytical insight are achieved by using the power of modern technology to create networks in systems that in the past were collections of separate components.

“We plan to be the best in the industry at helping farmers meet the food needs of a growing population,” said Dr. Rob Smith, senior vice president and general manager of Europe, Africa and Middle East. “Increased grain production is a very large part of this. Also very important is the long-lasting and widespread shift toward more protein-heavy diets containing more meat, milk and eggs.”
AGCO is uniquely equipped to serve the world’s farmers. AGCO can plant and harvest grains with its well-known tractors, harvesters and implements. And AGCO can help preserve and protect the grain worldwide in GSI storage and handling systems. AGCO products also assist in the harvest of hay, forages and other livestock feed crops necessary to produce the additional meat, milk and eggs global consumers are demanding. And through GSI, AGCO provides the feeding, watering and livestock production systems needed to produce the desired protein much more efficiently.

During its first 25 years, AGCO was not content to compete primarily in the most developed markets and, therefore, has become an aggressive leader in emerging markets.

For additional coverage on AGCO’s presence at SIMA, please visit sima.agcocorp.com.

 

Fighting Compaction: Tread Lightly

When Al Sheahan purchased a 12-row corn head last year to replace the six-row head on his combine, he had more than increased capacity in mind. He was also taking one more step toward implementing a controlled traffic farming (CTF) program and reducing compaction on the 2,800 acres he farms in partnership with neighbor Todd Myren near Nelson, Wis.

The front-axle suspension system on Massey Ferguson and other AGCO tractor brands ensures better tractive ability, reducing slip, which in turn reduces compaction.

The front-axle suspension system on Massey Ferguson and other AGCO tractor brands ensures better tractive ability, reducing slip, which in turn reduces compaction.

CTF systems, which have been more prevalent in Canada, Europe and Australia, are now gaining additional converts in the U.S., and for good reason. Research in tilled soils shows approximately 75 to 80% of the increase in soil density and 90% of wheel sinkage—both of which can ultimately limit plant growth—are caused during the first pass. However, CTF can limit the compacted area to less than 15% of a given field, compared to more than 50% from some uncontrolled traffic systems.

The benefit is to a farmer’s bottom line. Australian research over 20 years has shown CTF can improve grain quality and has the potential to increase grain yields by 2 to 16%.

There are other benefits, including improving fuel and other input efficiencies. Yet, CTF often requires an investment of time and money on the front end. For instance, Sheahan and Myren have purchased a variety of equipment that allows them to confine their footprint to the fewest traffic lanes. “Because all of our machines are set up for GPS-guided autosteering on an RTK system, we can use the same wheel tracks for just about every pass,” says Sheahan.

“A lot of our equipment already fits a 30-foot pattern, so the combine was just the next step,” Sheahan says of the Massey Ferguson® 8780 he bought used. “We try to plant no-till as much as we can and limit any other tillage to vertical tillage or a field cultivator. Still, our tillage equipment is 30 feet wide; our 12-row planter covers 30 feet; the sprayer covers 60 feet; and our RoGator,® which we use to apply liquid nitrogen, spans 90 feet.

“We have everything set up for 30-inch rows, with four rows between the tires on just about every machine,” he explains. “We realize, of course, that there will be more compaction on those wheel-track rows, but at least it will be limited to those rows.”

For more advice on how to limit compaction, including how to set tire pressure and the benefits of the front-axle suspension system on Massey Ferguson and other AGCO equipment, see http://www.myfarmlife.com/advantage/fighting-compaction-tread-lightly/.

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