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When It Comes to Data, It’s Farmer’s Choice

There are two types of data generated by farm equipment: agronomic and machine. Each type details performance of various operations, yet, as with income and an automobile’s fuel efficiency, most of us are less willing to share one as opposed to the other.

Illustration: Jamie Cole

Illustration: Jamie Cole

“The actual machine data itself, I don’t have a problem with sharing it,” says Devon Bryant, a farmer and custom harvester from northeast Arkansas, who says he’s a very loyal Massey Ferguson® and Hesston® customer. “I’ll let the manufacturer and dealer see it.” That, he says, will allow his dealership, Cox Implement, to remind him about service and “help the manufacturer … improve their technologies.”

Most farmers, however, feel differently when it comes to their agronomic information. According to results from an American Farm Bureau Federation survey, more than 75% of farmers who responded are concerned that such data could be used by a company or third party for market-sensitive commercial activities.

While Bryant doesn’t have that concern with AGCO—he uses the company’s AgCommand® telemetry and TaskDoc task-management technologies—he can understand why other farmers are more cautious overall. “Let’s say I’m contracted with somebody, and they’re growing a special variety that might be proprietary or it’s one they’re trying to get a patent on. They probably don’t want just anybody to know what their yields are. They could lose the advantage,” that Bryant says comes from years of work and investment.

It’s the Producers’ Data

AGCO has responded to such concerns by offering what the company calls a “two-pipe” approach to dealing with data generated through its equipment. “We treat the agronomic and machine data differently,” says Matt Rushing, vice president, product line for AGCO Advanced Technology Solutions. “The machine data, if the customer chooses, can be shared with AGCO and at the dealership level. That will be used to build better machines, through performance analyses and other measures, and also to improve the performance of the current machine.”

As for agronomic data, says Rushing, AGCO provides “a second pipe to transmit sensitive farm information, such as prescription maps, yield maps, applied data, and planning data.” That information, explains Rushing, “is never stored anywhere besides where the customer chooses to keep the information.

“First and foremost,” he continues, “it’s important to note that AGCO acknowledges that the grower owns all equipment and crop data generated by his or her equipment. It’s the producers’ data to control and share with the partners they choose, which is the main reason why we’re developing an open approach to all of our data-gathering products and services through Fuse Technologies. We believe the producer is the best person to make decisions about their own data, as well as their operations generally.”

For more information on AGCO’s Data Privacy policy, see There you can also learn more about Fuse Services, AGCO’s new maintenance management offering.

Harnessing the Power of Data as a Service Enabler

If you haven’t noticed, data is a pretty hot topic in the agricultural industry right now. With the rapid growth and adoption of precision farming products such as guidance, telematics, rate and section control, etc. – there has been, in parallel, a massive amount of data generated from global farming operations resulting from the outputs of these products. All of this data has created a wealth of opportunity for growers, agronomists, manufacturing companies, and other invested parties. However, many players in the Ag industry are still working to understand the best ways to utilize this data, so that these emerging opportunities can be fully realized.

Depending on where you sit in the realm of agriculture, there are different types of farm data that can be used in different ways to generate useful information. In the case of AGCO (being a machinery producer), we have identified an area where we believe there is an opportunity for our customers, dealers and AGCO to all become better. Our main interest as a company is utilizing machine data as a service enabler for our customers. Last month, AGCO announced a new service program that it will be rolling out to all AGCO dealers over the next few years. This program is called Fuse® Connected Services, and utilizes data coming from AGCO machines (with the customer’s permission) to provide enhanced services to AGCO customers.

The new service offering is enabled through AGCO’s telematics product, AgCommand®, and is delivered in the form of three service package offerings. Examples of some services that are provided include:

  • Proactive condition monitoring (remotely)
  • Machine Alerts (based on AGCO recommended thresholds)
  • Machine performance and efficiency reviews (Off-season consultation)
  • Full management of machine maintenance
  • Technology review and seasonal training

Through use of machine data and AGCO’s network of resources, AGCO dealers are able to turn data into useful information that can be used to help customers run machines more efficiently, identify training needs, maximize uptime and more. The idea behind this is simple; managing a farm operation is a lot of work. The logistics and planning aspect of farminTech Tuesday Datag alone is enough to keep growers occupied. Having to worry about potential machine breakdowns, maintenance and operator training on top of that can hinder efficiency by taking time away from other value added activities a farmer is responsible for. AGCO dealers can help manage and monitor customer machines so that the customer does not have to worry about his/her machines and operators being ready to execute during crunch time, freeing the farmer to focus on agronomic decisions. Rather than selling customers a radio modem that gives them data points about their machines, AGCO dealers will provide them with services and information that result in actionable insights and recommendations based on the dealer’s expert analysis of the customer’s machine data. This will result in greater uptime, efficiency and profitability for our customers. It will also enhance the service capability of our dealers and even provide AGCO with another means to improve the quality and design of our machines.

The idea of using machine data as a service enabler has already been seen in other industries. Construction companies such as Caterpillar have been doing it for a while now. Telecommunications provider Verizon has a robust program in place for optimizing fleet operations, and has even started something similar in the automotive industry. Verizon’s Hum monitors your vehicle and lets you know if anything goes wrong. Furthermore, it will even recommend repairs and provide you with estimates as to how much the repair may cost.

Consider this—if companies such as Verizon have identified a market opportunity on consumer and commercial vehicles, imagine the opportunity in agriculture. For the most part, a vehicle gets you from point A to point B. Agricultural equipment does much more than that. Growers buy specific machinery to generate a return for their operation. Agricultural equipment is more so a tool than a vehicle. Thus, the value of maximizing the performance of that tool is quite important to owners as it more directly impacts their income and livelihood.
AGCO is taking a big step forward with Fuse Connected Services. We are already piloting this program today in NA, EAME and SA, with dealer availability beginning Q1 of 2016.

For more information on AGCO’s precision farming products, data management policy and Fuse Connected Services, please visit


Ryan Johnson is a Sr. Global Marketing Specialist for AGCO’s Advanced Technology Solutions group, focusing on bringing AGCO’s Fuse precision farming technologies and services to market .

A Massey Ferguson® Fan for Life

When Bob and Darren Littleton purchased a lightly used Massey Ferguson® 8690 tractor about a year ago, the father-son team came full circle. Darren’s grandfather had once owned a Massey Ferguson dealership and his father was once 100% Massey. Yet, says Darren, “our family kind of drifted away” from the brand due, in large part, to hard times in the 1980s.

That separation, though, didn’t last. “Ever since AGCO acquired the brand … we’d toyed with the idea of going back to Massey Ferguson,” Darren relates. The reunion came to be in April 2014, when the Littletons purchased that MF8690 with only 500 hours on it.

“Massey Ferguson has come a long way,” says Bob. “We just love that [CVT] transmission. Even though about 90% of our fields are in a three-mile radius, we have one farm that is 25 miles away, and that 31-mph road speed is wonderful.”

Bob and Darren Littleton with their full line of AGCO equipment.

Bob and Darren Littleton with their full line of AGCO equipment.

“The fuel savings have been great too,” adds Darren.“The Dyna-VT™ transmission in combination with the DTM [Dynamic Tractor Management] system [makes] fuel economy unbelievable. We’ve used the tractor on everything from the vertical tillage tool to the grain cart during harvest.”

The MF8690 isn’t the only Massey Ferguson tractor that Darren has an interest in. Over the past few years, he has also been adding a number of vintage models to his tractor collection, most of which revolve around the Massey Ferguson row-crop models from the 1960s and ‘70s.

“I have four different MF1100 models, as well as an MF1150 that is in the paint shop,” he says. “In addition, I have an 1135 that I sometimes use to cut hay, and I have an MF1155 with only 3,300 hours that is really sharp,” he adds. “I still put about 50 hours a year on that one when I’m pulling one of the planters.

“Some people like to fish and some people like to play golf,” he concludes. “For me, it’s taking off to someplace like Illinois or Indiana to attend another farm auction that has a classic Massey Ferguson tractor on the sale bill.”

For more about the Littletons, see

New ProCut™ option launched for 2200 Series Large Square Balers

The new ProCut rotary cutter system introduces a range of new features to deliver a huge increase in capacity, a more uniform & consistent cut length, and exceptional service access. This new option is offered in 2250, 2270, and 2270XD models.

With a 10% speed increase, the new re-designed Hesston manufactured rotor promotes aggressive & even crop flow to bale edges. Combine this with the new Quad-Auger pick-up system to promote smooth feeding with a reduced potential for plugging and you will see your baling & cutting capacity greatly increase. Also, a unique feature for the ProCut option that will increase capacity is that the packer of a “non-cutter” baler remains behind the rotor – maximizing baling feeding capacity.

ProCut Field

For a more uniform & consistent cut length, the bolt-on rotor teeth have been designed wider with two hydraulically selectable knife banks in the magazine to allow operators the ability to quickly engage or disengage the knives and change cut lengths. No gaps in the knife bank provide uniform cut length across the entire bale width. These selectable knife configurations can be easily selected through the ISOBUS compatible C1000 or C2100 monitor. All models are equipped with minimum 1.5” cut length increments supported by a new serrated knife design for longer life and reduced wear. These knives can be removed to desired cut length easily, with no tools required.

ProCut Knife DrawerWith the need for improved service access, the new ProCut design is equipped with a hydraulic drop down & slide out knife bed drawer. This gives the operator easy access to all knives with no tools required.  Another feature for reduced maintenance costs & time is the unique bolt-on rotor teeth, which allow for easy replacement, in the case that a foreign object is met.


To see the new ProCut features in action, please visit  within the NEW Hesston Hay Youtube page.

ProCut Rotor













AGCO Looks to the Future of Agriculture at the 2015 Farm Progress Show

Earlier this month, we traveled to Decatur, Illinois, for the 62nd Farm Progress Show—the largest outdoor farm equipment show in the United States. Our exhibit included a 61,000-square-foot scaled-down farm that showcased the newest innovations in farm equipment, crop life cycle demonstrations, and a productivity lab.

We introduced attendees to the SOLOTM AGCO Edition Unmanned Aerial Vehicle, the X-Edition Challenger tractor (a limited-edition, all-black model), our all-new 3300 Command Series corn heads, the Massey Ferguson 6600M Series tractors, and Fuse Connected Services.

Here are some of the highlights from the show:

Fuse Tower








Challenger X-Edition

Challenger X-Edition








Fendt 900 Series

Fendt 900 Series
























To view additional pictures from the AGCO Farm, check out our Facebook photo album.

If you weren’t able to visit us in The Prairie State, we’ll be at Husker Harvest Days in Grand Island, Nebraska, and Big Iron Farm Show in West Fargo, North Dakota, both September 15-17, and AGRITECHNICA in Hanover, Germany, November 10-14.


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