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Massey Ferguson ProCut system is a cut above the rest

The new Massey Ferguson ProCut system for MF 2200 Series large square balers introduces unique clamp-on rotor fingers and a range of new features to deliver a huge increase in capacity with a finer, uniform chop while also offering superb service access.

The 650mm diameter ProCut rotor is equipped with 26mm wide hard-faced, cast steel fingers, which are made in three sections – each clamping onto the centre tube – and held in place with bolts.

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This unique mounting allows rotor finger sections to be replaced easily, saving time and maintaining optimum performance.

New Quad Augers, on each side, provide a consistent feed to the rotor. These increase capacity and ensure unrestricted, even feeding.

ProCut knives are mounted in a full-width, drop-down bed and are held in a ‘magazine’, which rolls out completely to the left-hand side on Easy Glide roller bearings, providing best-in-class access for servicing.

No tools are required. Simply releasing a catch after lowering the knife bed allows the whole magazine to roll out to one side, providing unrivalled access to the knife bank for servicing and maintenance.

Knives are spaced evenly 43.5mm apart across the bed, providing a fine, consistent chop. Made from 4mm thick tungsten hardened steel, the knives have a new serrated edge design to stay sharper longer and help cut power consumption. Simply releasing a locking pin makes it easy to lift out and change the knives.

Two hydraulically selectable knife banks in the magazine allow operators to quickly engage or disengage the knives and change chop lengths. Both knife banks are fitted with hydraulic protection. This uses an accumulator on each side that allow each knife bank fold back against the hydraulic pressure to let foreign objects to pass through.

The driveline on Massey Ferguson ProCut balers has been strengthened to handle the higher capacity it now provides, with all six-string models (making 120cm wide bales) driven through a new gearbox. The slip clutch can now also transmit 35% more torque.

Other changes include a new slip clutch and a revised cam track design for the pick-up, which gathers the swath more effectively and now be standard on all Massey Ferguson large square balers.

The ProCut system is controlled by the ISObus compatible C1000 terminal, which now includes buttons for knife control as well as pressure overrides.

ProCut is available on the MF 2240*, MF 2250, MF 2260, MF 2270 and MF 2270 XD.  (*MF 2240 is not available in all markets).

MF 35 – the People’s Tractor – launched in Kenya

Massey Ferguson is launching a tractor for the Kenya market which will provide emerging farmers and new-start agricultural contractors with the important first step in farm mechanisation.

“Straightforward, dependable and affordable, the 36hp MF 35 is truly the ‘People’s Tractor’,” says Richard Markwell, Vice President and Managing Director Massey Ferguson Europe/Africa/Middle East. “This well-proven model offers exactly the right specification and technical features for Kenya’s emerging farm enterprises. It brings mechanisation to a new generation of farmers, farm workers and entrepreneurs. It is the ideal, multi-purpose machine particularly for first-time tractor owners and operators who are ambitious to develop their businesses and transform their families’ livelihoods. Our message is clear – for those who thought that a tractor straight from the showroom was out of reach, then think again because the MF 35 could be the perfect solution.”

Sales, parts, training and service support are being handled by Massey Ferguson’s highly-experienced National Distributor, FMD which has a nationwide network of outlets and mobile service teams. A special package of implements to complement the MF 35 tractor is also under development to include a choice of cultivation, planting and transport equipment.

With strong Massey Ferguson heritage, this latest MF 35 is based on the renowned machine, with the same model number, which cemented its reputation in Africa and around the world over many years. Key features include a rugged 36hp engine, 6-forward/2-reverse speed mechanical gearbox and hard-wearing robust construction. Easy-to-use and maintain, the MF 35 is highly flexible. It is equally at home in cultivation, planting, transport or yard duties, working across a wide range of farm sectors including arable, livestock and horticulture, flower, tea and coffee production – making Kenya the ideal market. The tractor’s compact size means it is exceptionally manoeuvrable on smaller plots of land, while its rear three-point hitch boasts maximum lift capacity of 1100 kg enabling use of a wide variety of implements – ranging from transport boxes and mowers to ploughs and cultivators.

The launch of the MF 35 is part of Massey Ferguson’s parent company AGCO’s commitment under the Grow Africa initiatives of the World Economic Forum. AGCO is a business champion for Grow Africa which is focused on accelerating private sector investment for sustainable growth in African agriculture.

Tough guy Alex muscles up to retain Italy’s Strongman title

Massey Ferguson-supported heavyweight Alex Curletto clinched first place in the semi-finals of Italy’s Strongest Man competition in Pisa. This puts him in a front-running position as the Championship moves onto the finals in Florence in September.

All power to Alex Curletto who came top in the semi-finals of Italy’s Strongest Man Championship.

All power to Alex Curletto who came top in the semi-finals of Italy’s Strongest Man Championship. Photo courtesy of Salvatore Gioia.

Alex works for Massey Ferguson’s parent company, AGCO as an Accounts Payable Analyst based at the Company’s UK operations at Abbey Park, Stoneleigh in Warwickshire.

“It was a double victory for me personally as also I beat the Spanish champion who was the clear favourite to win the Pisa contest,” says Alex who trains for two hours a day, five days a week. “I won Italy’s Strongest Man title last year and I’m fully-focused on retaining my title. I’d like to thank Massey Ferguson for its continued support.”

“My training regime includes weight lifting and cardiovascular work. Right now, I’m consuming 5000-8000 calories daily to maintain my strength and size, and currently weigh in at around 160kg (26 stone). After the Italy Finals in September, I’ll be setting my sights on the World’s Strongest Man Championship 2016.”

Good Luck to Alex for his next test of raw power in Florence!

For more information, please click here

Take care to apply the right amount of fertiliser when placing with seed

There are a number of factors to consider when placing fertiliser with seed according to Dr. Mike Stewart from the International Plant Nutrition Institute in Norcross, Georgia, USA.

Placing fertiliser in-furrow with the seed during planting is a common practice in small grain production and to some extent in row-crop production. Placing fertiliser with the seed can be an effective and beneficial management practice, but over- application and mismanagement can result in seedling damage, and ultimate stand and yield loss. The type of crop, fertiliser source, row spacing, and soil environment all affect how much fertiliser can be safely applied with seed.

Type of crop: Some crops are more susceptible to injury from in-furrow fertilisation than others. Oil seed crops are particularly sensitive; therefore most guidelines allow no fertiliser placed with the seed of these crops. The general order of sensitivity (most to least) among major crops grown on the Great Plains in the United States is soybeans > sorghum > corn > small grains.

Type of fertiliser: Fertilisers are salts, and these salts can affect the ability of the seedling to absorb water… too much fertiliser (salt) and seedling desiccation or “burn” can occur. Some fertiliser materials have a higher salt index or burn potential than others. Salt index values are usually included in basic agronomic texts, or are available from fertiliser dealers or extension resources such as government bodies or universities. As a general rule, most common nitrogen (N) and potassium (K) fertilisers have higher salt indexes than phosphorus (P) fertilisers; therefore, a common predictor for the potential for salt damage is the sum of N+K2O per acre (0.4 ha) applied with the seed. For example, most guidelines for corn (maize) in 30 inch (76.2 cm) rows will allow for no more than 10 lb (4.5kg)/A of N+K2O in medium to fine textured soils — assuming no urea-containing products are used.

Ammonia formation potential of fertiliser: Fertilisers that have the potential to release free ammonia can cause ammonia toxicity to germinating seeds or young emerging seedlings. Thus, extra caution must be used with in-furrow placement of urea-containing fertilisers. In some cases urea-ammonium nitrate (UAN) or urea can be applied successfully in-furrow in small grain production, but this requires careful consideration of several factors including those discussed below.

Row spacing: For a specific set of circumstances (i.e. crop, soil conditions, etc.) the safe rate of in-furrow fertiliser increases as row spacing narrows or decreases. A narrowing row space has the effect of diluting fertiliser over more linear feet (metres) of row.

Soil type and environment: Soil conditions that tend to concentrate salts, or stress the germinating seed, increase the potential for damage. So, the safe limit for in-furrow fertilisation is reduced with sandier soil texture and in drier soil conditions. Also, environmental conditions that induce stress and/or slow germination (e.g. cold temperature) can prolong fertiliser-seed contact and thus increase the likelihood of damage.

Seed bed utilisation: The more scatter there is between seed and fertiliser in the seed band or row, the more fertiliser can be safely applied. The type of planting equipment and seed opener influences the intimacy of seed-fertiliser contact. The concept of “seed bed utilisation” (SBU) has been used to address this factor. SBU is simply the seed row width divided by the row width (i.e., proportion of row width occupied by seed row). The wider the seed row for a specific row width the greater the SBU. As SBU increases so does the safe rate of in-furrow fertilisation.

* Reprinted from the International Plant Nutrition Institute, Plant Nutrition Today Series by Dr Mike Stewart. http://www.ipni.net/pnt

Danish cyclists all set for trip to Beauvais tractor plant

Sixty cyclists from Denmark are due to set off on the exciting ‘MF Tour de Beauvais 2015’ this Saturday 27 June.

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In a trip scheduled to last seven days, the intrepid riders will be pedalling 1226 km from Brørup in Southern Denmark to the AGCO manufacturing facility in Beauvais France, centre of Massey Ferguson tractor production in Europe.

From Denmark, the tour will pass through the Netherlands and Belgium before crossing the border into France at Hestrud. We’ll keep you up to date with their progress and you can also follow their journey on the Massey Ferguson Global Facebook page.

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