Powered by Google
Brands
 

Author Archive

DISCussions: No Words

I find myself in an awkward predicament.  As a blogger, my role is to share.  As an observer, I was speechless.

It was time to make a “farm tour” and check the fields.  Expanses of cut wheat shared the horizon with earnest fields of beans, milo, corn and the occasional fallow ground.  Cliche though it may be, I stood in the road’s intersection and looked to each compass point.  The silence surrounded me.

I thought of the generations of families who have chosen to be good stewards and respect the land.  I thought of the faded billboard reminding passersby that “one Kansas farmer feeds 128 people and you”.  I thought of our neighbors in North Dakota and along the Missouri river whose fields and homes are under water; those in Oklahoma and Texas whose crops died for lack of moisture; and those in the Southwest fighting sand storms and wildfires.

Then I smiled.

Knowing, in my heart, “country folk” will lend a hand as needed; then rebuild and replant.  After all —- they have a world to feed.

Editors note: In honor of World Population Day we celebrate all of the farmers that work hard day-in and day-out to provide enough food to support our ever-growing populations. AGCO works hard to provide farmers with high-tech solutions so that they CAN feed the world. So as you eat your breakfast this morning, take a moment and think about the farmers that contributed to everything you are eating. Learn more about world population growth.

DISCussions: “Putting the Fun in FUNdraising”

Team co-captain Arlene Zachary cuts Kirk Cool’s 13-inch ponytail for Locks of Love

How do 350 employees generate $6,631 for the American Cancer Society’s “Relay for Life” event? They put FUN into fundraising. For more than 15 years, the employees at the AGCO-Beloit and Cawker City facilities have supported their Relay team by opening their wallets and giving generously. You may remember reading about this in an earlier post.

This year the AGCO team was able to contribute to two worthy organizations, American Cancer Society and Locks of Love , through the “Get ‘er Cut Fund”. Kirk Cool, Beloit Machine Shop Supervisor offered to cut 10 inches of his ponytail for $500 for the Relay. Then he agreed to an additional one-half inch for every $50 over the goal.

The goal of $500 was met fairly quickly. The fund leveled off at $615 until someone donated $85 which put the haircut at 12 inches. Just before the deadline for contributing, an individual presented $100. During a plant-wide employee meeting June 8, Kirk Cool got a haircut from team co-captain Arlene Zachary; and Locks of Love got a 13-inch gift.

This year’s team members are: Arlene Zachary, co-captain; Eve Flynn, co-captain; Steven Isley; Kathy Hargett; Ethan Smith-Esogbue; Ruth Roberts, and Chandra Ackerman. AGCO employees in Beloit and Cawker City have demonstrated their support of the Relay for Life event for many years. They have donated their personal time and money because they believe there should be more birthdays.

What is the funnest thing you have ever done for charity?

DISCussions: Beloit, Kansas Hosts European Visitors

On 25 May 2011, AGCO Challenger dealers hosted nearly twenty customers from  Germany and Austria to a rain-soaked visitBeloit Visitors in Kansas, USA.  The visitors were part of the Challenger Tour 2011 to experience farming operations in the United States and see first-hand how AGCO farm equipment is produced.  After landing in Chicago, USA the group visited a farm in Iowa.  During their stopover in Minnesota they toured the AGCO Jackson facility. They spent the night in Kansas City, Kansas before arriving in Beloit.  A tour of AGCO Hesston and of a Wichita, Kansas grain elevator completed their North America journey.

The schedule of events in Beloit included a barbeque lunch, plant tour and farm visit.   As anyone knows who lives in, or regularly visits, the Plains States region, weather plays a large factor in outdoor activities.  This trip was no exception.

Beloit Visitors

Watching a computer-aided welding demonstration during plant tour.

The week prior, Kansas fields were dangerously dry.  On the day the guests were to be at a farm site, it was still raining from the previous stormy night.  Consequently, the barbeque was moved indoors and the plant tour took a little extra time.  Eventually, there was enough of a break in the rain to stop by one local farm west of Beloit.

The group was able to look at the machinery and “talk shop” comparing farming practices.

Engineering Manager, Rye DeGarmo had this to say, “the highlight of the trip was the farmer-to-farmer discussion.  Both the local and European farmers were interested in each others’ farming practices, especially yield amounts and fertilizer usage. Farmers from both continents were surprised to find the numbers of large farms are growing in a very similar fashion to their own — but on opposite sides of the world.”

What is considered a large farm where you live?

Jo Herian: DISCussions

“Toto, I’m not in Kansas anymore”.Jo Herian

It is amazing how this blog can take me from Kansas to the world — and bring the world to Kansas.  Glad you could stop by for a visit!  Contrary to popular belief, Kansas is not flat {a motorcycle out of gas will confirm that fact}; we like barbeque; and working hard/ playing hard is a way of life.

Wheat harvest is June when it’s hot and windy.  Beans and milo are cut in the fall around frosts, rains and snows.

And in the middle of it all is AGCO located in Beloit, Kansas with a satellite plant in Cawker City, Kansas.

AGCO Beloit’s website www.sunflowermfg.com tells the plant’s history and details the Sunflower branded product lines.  This transplanted city girl has the privilege of visiting with you about the happenings at AGCO Beloit and the area farm community.

My name is Jo Herian and have worked at the Beloit plant over 20 years.  Please join me and let’s put some gravel in our travels.

Join Us on Twitter