Author Archive

Factory Farms Drive Technology Adoption and Sustainability Improvements

By Chris Rhodes

There was a refreshing op-ed piece in the New York Times a few weeks ago.  Typically when city-based media focus their energy on agriculture, the focus is on organic labels, artisanal foods, and craft beers – forgetting about the real work of feeding a growing population of seven billion people.  In the article, author Jayson Lusk talked about how technology is enabling fewer farmers, on less land, with a smaller environmental footprint get the work done to feed more people better food.  He highlighted that in the 1950’s farm technology would have required 180 million acres to produce the same amount of soy that is produced on 80 million US acres today, and that it would require a whopping 308 million acres to produce the corn that is currently grown on 80 million acres.  Without the technology that creates this kind of efficiency, we would not be able to feed the current population—80% of whom now live in cities.

In addition to the focus on productivity, it was nice to see an article that admits that there is no group of people who love the land more, and are better stewards of the land, than farmers.  Jayson points out that the term ‘Factory Farm’ is generally used as a pejorative, but that most farms are actually still owned by families.  He also points out that it is precisely the attention to detail, and the scale of the ‘Factory Farm’ that allows for the technology development and use that drives down the ecological cost of farming while still feeding the world.  It’s these larger farms that are driving the adoption of technology that reduces the use of water and chemicals and that allows for the low- and no-till cropping that has reduced soil erosion 40% since the 1980’s.

Finally, Jayson alludes to the immense complexity that comes with bringing together a bunch of different types of technology.  That complexity remains one of the main stumbling blocks of technology adoption, but not one that can’t be overcome.  A continued focus on driving technology through mobile devices and on connecting technology more openly will ensure that the strides we are making with technology will continue to deliver the productivity and environmental benefits we have been seeing over the last couple of decades.

For more information about how AGCO solutions are helping growers large and small become more efficient, visit

Chris Rhodes is the Global Director of Commercial ATS (Advanced Technology Solutions) and Partnerships for Fuse®, AGCO’s next generation approach to precision farming. Chris helps ensure the delivery of Fuse technologies and services to our customers and the advancement of the Fuse open approach through industry partnerships and strategic alliances.

IoTF: The Internet of Things for Farming

By Timothy Chou

AGCO is excited to have guest blogger Dr. Timothy Chou of Stanford University join us on the Fuse Blog

Some of you have heard about the Internet of Things. While many will wonder why a coffee pot needs to talk to a toaster there is even greater potential in using advanced software, machine learning, and cloud computing to transform the planet’s fundamental infrastructure and build precision machines. In this blog we’ll focus on the benefits of using these precision machines to enable precision industries, whether that’s farming, mining or transportation.




Precision Machines

So what are the benefits of precision agricultural machines to the farmer, or more generally what are the benefits of precision machines to the businesses that use these machines? We are going to discuss two of these benefits in this blog.

Lower Consumable Costs

Many machines consume materials during operations. This could be fuel in the case of an airplane, ink for a high-speed printer or chemical reagents in a gene sequencer. These consumables often form a large portion of the operational cost structure. As anyone with an inkjet printer knows, the cost of the printer is not near as much as the cost of the toner cartridge you buy every year before tax day. At the enterprise level in the airline industry, the single largest operational cost is fuel – in some cases that’s nearly 30 percent of the total cost of the flight.

In the railroad business New York Air Brake has engineered a product to help operate trains more precisely.  This product, called LEADER, is being used by Norfolk Southern railroad, which operates in 22 eastern states. They attribute a five percent fuel savings to their deployment of LEADER, resulting in not only 10.8 million gallons of diesel fuel saved per year, but also the avoidance of more than 109,500 metric tons of greenhouse gas emissions.

Improved Safety

The derailment of an Amtrak train in Philadelphia in 2015 left at least six people dead and created chaos on the heavily traveled Northeast corridor the next morning, cutting off all direct rail service between Philadelphia and New York City and causing many other delays up and down the east coast. But if you can tell the train operator what to do, it’s a short step to just having the computers do it.

In 2016, the first automated train will run from the north of Australia to Perth to deliver iron ore.  Not only will it reduce their costs as they railroad has to spend $300,000 in salary for these operators, but also reducing human error will result in a safer railroad.

While technology is cool, its real usage has been to transform businesses. We’re all familiar with the examples from the consumer space (Google, Uber, eBay), but IoT technology has the potential to do the same for producers and consumers of the machines used in agriculture, healthcare, power, transportation, water and more. For a manufacturer of Things, technology can not only reduce the cost and improve the quality of service, but also deliver new revenue sources. As a consumer of this next generation of Things, you have the ability to use precision machines to deliver higher quality and lower cost food, power and water, and safer and lower cost transportation and healthcare.

For more information about IoT and how it might reshape your business check out the recently released book Precision: Principles, Practices and Solutions for the Internet of Things.

For more information about AGCO’s own Internet of Things for the Farm (IoTF), visit to learn about our precision farming technologies and services.

Effective Alfalfa Stand Management

By Darren Goebel

Alfalfa is a crop that responds well to management. Growers should plan to manage alfalfa differently, however, depending on its planned use, yield goals and how often it is acceptable to refresh the stand. Stand establishment, fertility and cutting management are the three main tools growers can use to affect quality, yield and stand persistence, with cutting timing having the biggest impact on the these characteristics.

Relative feed value, a measure of quality, is highest when alfalfa is cut at the bud stage. This is especially important when growers are raising alfalfa for dairy cows, since dairy cows need the very best ration in order to maximize milk output. One consequence of repeatedly harvesting at the bud stage, however, is that alfalfa stands will need to be reestablished more often, since the plant doesn’t have time to adequately recover between cuttings. Yield per cutting will also be reduced when cutting at the bud stage. However, since an additional cutting per year can usually be taken, total yield per acre per season will be pretty similar to cutting at full bloom. For growers who want to optimize stand, quality and yield, cutting at 10% bloom is a good alternative. Cutting at this stage provides acceptable hay for beef cattle and horses.


No matter what your management plan, eventually stand density will decrease. Plant and stem counts should be conducted periodically to determine the yield potential of a field. When alfalfa growth is 4 to 6 inches in height, use stem counts (stems per square foot) as the preferred density measure. Count only the stems expected to be tall enough to mow. A stem density of 55 per square foot has good yield potential. Expect some yield loss with stem counts between 40 and 50. Consider replacing the stand if there are less than 40 stems per square foot and the crown and root health is poor. Older stands typically have fewer plants per square foot, but older plants produce more stems than younger plants.


When replacing alfalfa stands, rotate to corn or small grains for a minimum of one year to avoid auto-toxicity. If you plan to go back to alfalfa, check pH, P, and K levels before reseeding. It is very important to maintain medium to high nutrient levels and pH should be maintained as closely to 7 as possible. Due to alfalfa seed size, seed to soil contact is critical, so seedbeds must be thoroughly prepared to prevent clods. A Sunflower® 6333 land finisher or 6830 rotary finisher with reel is the ideal alfalfa seedbed preparation tool. Seed alfalfa to a ¼ to ½ inch depth on clay or loam soils and ½ to 1 inch depth on sandy soils. A Sunflower 9610 grain drill with legume seeder paired with a Fendt tractor is the perfect combination to plant alfalfa accurately.


National Farm Safety and Health Week


167 farm workers are injured on a farm and a worker dies in a farm accident EVERY DAY.

38 children are injured on a farm EVERY DAY and a child dies in a farm accident EVERY THREE DAYS.

Farm safety is important to every farmer and operator.  AGCO® works hard to deliver safe equipment and operating instructions on how to use our equipment most effectively.  In recognition of National Farm Safety and Health week AGCO offers the following guidelines to help make sure EVERYONE stays safe during harvest:

  1. Manual and Safety Signs. Read your operator’s manual and safety sign information.  They are packed with information to help you be more productive, increase the life of your equipment and keep you, your family, and workers safe.
  2. Maintenance. Keep all machinery serviced and maintained properly.
  3. Guards. Make sure all guards and shields are in place and secure.
  4. Turn the machine off when not operating. Put equipment in neutral or park, engage parking brake and turn off engine before dismounting. Wait until all mechanisms have stopped moving before attempting to service or unclog a machine.
  5. Working under the machine. Lock hydraulic cylinders or support the head prior to working.
  6. Crop Debris. Make sure all crop debris is removed at frequent intervals to reduce potential fire hazards and possible equipment damage.
  7. Fire Extinguishers. Keep and maintain suitable fire extinguishers on your combine. Make sure they are accessible from the ground.
  8. Children. Create a Safe Play Area for children on the farm that has effective adult supervision and safe play activities for children.  Equipment cabs are not safe play areas.
  9. Bystanders. Keep bystanders and others away from the equipment operation area.
  10. Blind spots. Make sure the area behind the combine is clear before backing.
  11. Riders? Limit riders on equipment! Instructional seats are designed for training or diagnosing machine problems.
  12. Seat belts. Wear seat belts.  ANYONE in the cab should have his or her seatbelt fastened.  Do not lean against the windshield or rely on it to keep you in the cab.
  13. ROPS. Have rollover protective structures fitted on tractors.
  14. Towing. Always use safety chains for towed equipment.
  15. SMV. Always use a slow moving vehicle sign and flashing amber warning lights on public roads.
  16. Road Safety. Never travel left of the center of the road after dark, during poor visibility or when approaching the top of a hill or a curve.
  17. Stay alert. Be physically and mentally fit when operating machinery. Fatigue, stress, medication, alcohol and drugs can detract from safe equipment operation. Take breaks.
  18. Training. Train all operators to safely operate the equipment.

1 2012 Data from CDC website:

2 2014 Fact Sheet, National Children’s Center for Rural and Agricultural Health and Safety

For more information see the following websites:


Becknology with AGCO and Beck’s Hybrids

AGCO is collaborating with Beck’s Hybrids to demonstrate yield and productivity advantages of the new Sunflower 9830NT. The 9830NT was featured at a recent Beck’s field day (Becknology Days) in Henderson, KY. Throughout the course of the day, hundreds of growers went through the Equipment Innovations class and then stopped by to look at the iron. The theme was technology-enabled productivity that is providing the most accurate seeding system for wheat, early soybeans, and double-crop soybeans.

Equip Innovations


Beck’s is very interested in plot work that will help farmers make the right decisions about agronomic inputs as well as equipment decisions. The 9830NT can put down fertilizer with wheat in the fall, which can improve yields by 5-10 bushels per acre. It is also the best drill on the market for seeding into heavy wheat residue. Alex Long of Beck’s talked about the trial work Beck’s is conducting that examines seeding accuracy at 6, 8, and 10 mph compared to a Kinze planter. Results will be available this fall.

Working with companies like Beck’s is a great way for the equipment industry to stay connected with independent agronomic testing and to be able to share our products with a diverse group of customers.

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In addition to support and testing of the 9830NT, Beck’s is promoting AGCO’s X-Edition MT700E and MT800E tractors.

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Beck’s has more Becknology days coming up. Follow the link below for dates in your area:

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