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The Sunflower 6830 Series: A New Era in Tillage

With wet conditions impacting much of the corn and soybean-producing areas of Minnesota and Iowa, it has been tough to perform effective tillage. However, last week, the clouds parted for a few days and gave way to fair tillage conditions before the rains returned. During this time, I took the New Sunflower 6830 High-Speed Rotary Finisher for a trip across 230-bushel corn planted in the 36,000 to 39,000 plant population. I was very impressed with the tool’s performance in both sizing and mixing residue.

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The corn was harvested using a chopping corn head. Highest-yielding corn was in the range of 240 bushels with an average yield of 203. Row spacing was planted on 30-inch rows. Very soft field conditions were present during harvest leaving ruts 4 to 6 inches deep where the harvester and grain cart was run. Operating speed of the tool was at 11.5 mph. The depth of the 6830 was set and checked at 4 inches. The width of this unit was 29 feet. 11.5 mph x 29 feet = 333.5/8.25 = 40.43 acres per hour. The Sunflower 6830 was pulled with a Challenger 855E tractor, which burned 17 gallons per hour during this operation.

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I took a 5-foot by 6-foot area and painted it with marker paint to give a visual of the chopping, sizing and mixing the residue mat left on the soil surface.

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In the above picture, you can see the extraordinary job the Sunflower 6830 did in chopping, sizing and mixing the residue mat. In some areas of the country, this single pass will provide a sufficient job in allowing the residue to be broken down prior to the next planting season.  Although difficult to see, this picture was taken directly in the wheel track seen in the first picture of the painted residue.  Not only were the residue and soil mixed, but also completely leveled a 4-inch rut left by the combine.

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These pictures show the tool’s ability to manage the root mass that is left and needs to be managed before further tillage or planting the next crop. Not only are we managing the surface residue, but also the below-surface residue. The sooner we can start the incorporation of this residue with the soil and its many helpful microorganisms, the faster that residue can start the decomposition process.

I’m lucky enough to run several of these Sunflower tools. Sunflower 6830 High-Speed Rotary Finisher is one of the only tools that can prepare a seedbed in the spring by leaving a level seedbed to plant into. It can also perform the act of residue management in the fall and succeed at both.

Justin Remus

AGCO Product Specialist

I studied agronomy at South Dakota State University. I have several years of experience working with students, growers and my own family farm to develop practices that work in the real world.

Currently, I cover territories in Minnesota and Iowa for the AGCO Corp working on several projects related to the 2017 AGCO Crop Tour. In addition, I have been working with several of the new tools that AGCO has brought to market in the past 12 months; the White Planter 9800VE Series and the Challenger 1000 Series.

Visit http://agcocropcare.com/ for more information.

See AGCO’s Latest Innovations at Farm Progress Show

Farm Progress Show
 
 
 

 
 

 

 

 

 
2015 is the biggest year yet for technology in the history of AGCO, and we’re bringing our newest innovations to the Farm Progress Show! We’ll be introducing six new products and services as part of AGCO’s Fuse strategy. Come see how AGCO’s Fuse Technologies and technology-enabled services can help you:

  • Revolutionize the way you manage your operation
  • Make decisions based on actionable data
  • Eliminate guess work

Introducing a new approach to farm optimization

We’ve got a great lineup planned, including a 61,000-square-foot, scaled-down version of a farm to demonstrate how we’re tackling the complex challenges in farming. You’ll also have the opportunity to see the latest innovations from all of our brands.

Here’s a sneak peak at a few other highlights:

  • Live, Pre-Owned Equipment Certification
  • FUSE Observation Deck & Giveaway
  • Headland Management Demo Experience
  • And more!

Visit the Fuse Tower on the AGCO lot between Second and Third Street, at Central Progress Avenue.

Can’t make it to the Farm Progress Show? Follow us on FacebookTwitter and Instagram for show updates.

My experience as AGCO‘s Africa Ambassador at Africa Summit 2015

Written by: Jean Kaahwa, AGCO Africa Ambassador 2015

AGCO Africa Summit 2015On the night of 16th January 2015, I said warm goodbyes to my immediate family and they wished me all the best in Berlin, Germany. As I set off to the airport I kept having flashbacks of my journey in the agriculture sector from the time when I was dreaming of turning that idle swamp into a productive fish farm, how the dream materialized, my growth in the agribusiness sector and eventually heading to Berlin as AGCO‘s Africa Ambassador for 2015.

I travelled from Uganda via Istanbul and was received warmly by a gentleman in Berlin. I was amazed at the beauty and scenery of the city that met me. At the hotel I bumped into Sue Musunga Chuzu, who was AGCO‘s first Africa Ambassador in 2012, and I immediately felt at home.

I later met the warm and friendly AGCO team and AGCO Africa Ambassador 2014, Joy Jelimo Chelagat as well. Joy and I toured Berlin together the next day and also visited the Africa Summit venue.

On the morning of the 4th AGCO Africa Summit I was nervous. However, I received some encouraging words from Mr. Nuradin Osman, Managing Director Africa and Middle East of AGCO, and Dr. Amrita Cheema, one of the moderators of the conference, just before the program started.

Looking at the conference agenda made me feel like I had to listen to every word spoken as I found the topics and presentations practical, applicable and contextual for the smallholder farmers like me in Africa. Read the rest of this entry »

Rural Hospital’s Future Is Bright Thanks to Biomass

Biomass, as a sustainable fuel, does more than just help the environment—it saves lives. Many rural hospitals have antiquated boiler systems that burn oil for fuel during the cold winter months. This is not a sustainable heat source, and the cost is putting many of them in the red. These hospitals often are the only close access to medical care in low income communities.

Biomass Hospital

Piedmont Geriatric State Hospital in Burkeville, Virginia, is using biomass to keep its buildings warm during those long winters. The hospital burns around 3,000 tons of native warm season grasses (NWSG) as biofuel, supplied by FDC Enterprises, from November to May. The hospital saves, on average, more than $1,300 per day during those seven months.

On an energy basis, biomass is roughly one-third the cost of fuel, which quickly adds up. Glenn Farris stated, “For many rural hospitals, being able to save over $200,000 per year is the difference between staying open or closing their doors. It can also be the way to bring that next important lifesaving machine or a new doctor to their facility. It can’t help but make you feel good to know you work for a company and in an industry that can make great things like this happen.”

By using biomass energy, hospitals can save money normally used to heat the building and instead better serve the community. Biomass is a win for rural hospitals, the communities they serve and the environment. To learn more about AGCO Biomass solutions, please visit: http://bit.ly/AGCOBiomass.

Introducing #AG4Good: Powering the Future

AGCO has proudly partnered with the Zambia 4-H project to help prepare Africa’s children to meet urgent global needs, including hunger, sustainable livelihoods and food security. By 2015, 4-H will equip 250,000 young people in Sub-Saharan Africa with the knowledge and skills needed for improved, sustainable livelihoods. Click here to learn more about the #AG4Good initiative on our Facebook page.
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