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The New White Planters 9000 Series

With the exclusive edge-drop technology and simple, positive air-metering system, White Planters’ row-crop planters have long been the industry leader in seed placement accuracy. Because they also have fewer parts than competitive machines, they’re known for their easy maintenance, as well as machine longevity.

Available with a full range of options and attachments, the new planters may be configured to fit any production system.

Available with a full range of options and attachments, the new planters may be configured to fit any production system.

The new 9000 Series from White Planters® builds upon that reputation with several new innovations. For example, row unit adjustments are now more convenient and the new cast row unit consists of only three components, reducing part count by 70% as compared to previous models, and providing greater strength and durability. Available with a full range of options and attachments, the new planters may be configured to fit any production system, from conventional to no-till, and to plant crops ranging from corn, soybeans and sunflowers to sorghum, sugar beets and peanuts.

“We’ve been building durable, long-lasting planters for nearly 40 years, and we’ve learned what it takes to deliver seed placement accuracy in a wide range of conditions,” says Gary Hamilton, product marketing specialist with White Planters. “The extensive redesign of the 9000 Series puts it all together in one package and makes this the most significant introduction for White Planters in a dozen years.”

The series also includes an all-new 12-row, narrow-transport, three-section Model 9812-30, which offers 30-inch row spacing and the efficiency of a central fill system (CFS). As with other planters in the series, though, the 9812 can be equipped with either 2- or 3-bushel, individual row-mounted seed hoppers and is available with ground-drive or variable-rate, hydraulic-drive seeding-rate control.

“I’ve always liked White Planters,” says Alan Demmel, who purchased a limited production model of 9812 planters for his farm near Madison, Neb. “The new 9812-30 just seemed to have everything I had been wanting in a planter, especially the narrower transport width. It’s also a heavy planter with a lot of flexibility, which works really well for my no-till program.

“White Planters has always been known for being heavy enough and tough enough to ‘plant in concrete’ if you had to, so I guess that’s one of the things I like about them. I’m still going through the learning curve, but once I learn to use the precision of the new seed meters, I think it’s going to be a good planter.”

The 9812-30 joins two other three-section, narrow-transport models—the 9816-30, 16-row and 9824-30, 24-row 30-inch planters. The frames on all three models flex 21 degrees up or down at each wing for consistent planting depth across irregular terrain.

For full details about each of the models in the 9000 Series, visit white-planters.com or see your local White Planters dealer.

 

From The Land Up

Tommy Porter chokes up when he talks about the land. As he tops a hill, he leans on a young oak tree. Eyes misting. Cheeks flushing. Spring green hay fields and cattle pastures roll out behind him.

Porter owns these 600 acres and another 308 down the road. He raises beef cattle, poultry and hogs, but he subscribes to the belief that he’s a borrower, a steward.

“The bank and I may hold this property, but we’re here for a short time,” he says.

“To be able to tend to part of God’s creation, that means something to me.”

Just 30 miles to the southwest sits the glass-and-steel, corporate skyline of Charlotte. It’s North Carolina’s largest, most metropolitan city. Here on the outskirts of the town of Concord, however, Porter has carved out his peace.

By the late 1970s, he and his wife Vicki were ready to chase the dream and started their cattle herd with five cows. In the mid-1980s, they bought 200 acres of corn and soybeans, and converted them to pasture.

In 30-plus years, they have grown the herd to 350 Hereford-Angus cows and calves. Along the way, Porter invested in the chicken business, expanding that operation to 68,000 broiler pullets and 30,000 broiler egg layers for Tyson Foods. The third leg of the livestock operation includes 2,200 large, white sows that breed between 102 and 105 pigs per week for Murphy-Brown.

Porter’s family has been a large part of his farm’s success. Growing up, his sons, Derek and Jared, and his daughter, Erin, performed daily chores and remained interested in the farm. Even though they’ve all got other full-time careers these days, Derek, a firefighter, still works the farm on his days off. And Jared’s wife, Colleen, now manages the layer houses.

“Tommy started with a dream,” says Chip Blalock, executive director of Sunbelt Ag Expo. “He didn’t inherit anything. He did it all the old fashioned way from scratch.” Judges considered the scope of Porter’s success a major factor when naming him the 2011 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year.

Part of Porter’s award as Farmer of the Year included the year-long use of any Massey Ferguson tractor serviced by Statesville Ag and Turf. He says he selected the MF5465 for its size. The 100 pto horsepower is the perfect fit for spreading fertilizer on his hay fields, then cutting and baling it when the time is right.

“It’s nice and roomy,” says Tommy, which is no surprise considering it has one of the largest cabs in its class. And the 61 square feet of glass translates to an immense amount of visibility. Another feature they really love is that the cab has its own suspension. “It makes a big difference when you spend 8 or 10 hours riding in something that’s comfortable,” says Tommy.

With one hand, they can move smoothly through the gears of the clutchless Dyna 4, 16-speed transmission. And because the environment, and quite frankly the economy, are so important to the Porters, the AGCO Power engine, with exceptional fuel economy and low emissions, makes a great deal of sense.

Because in the past there were no large Massey Ferguson dealers near the Porters, their farm has used John Deere equipment. But this honeymoon period with the MF5465 has made a believer of Derek, who uses it the most.

“Every time he uses it,” says Tommy, “he makes a point to say, ‘I really like that tractor. I like it better than the John Deere.’”

Read the full story at http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/from-the-land-up/.

Doing Good

As a group, those who work in agriculture are some of the most generous people on the planet. We’re simply hardwired to help neighbors and strangers alike.

Rick Gray: This Massey Ferguson dealership executive is planting seeds.

Rick Gray: This Massey Ferguson dealership executive is planting seeds.

It’s that spirit we salute here in this special feature, noting several extraordinary people and their stories of sacrifice and perseverance. Very special people who used words and phrases such as “rewarding” and “got way more out than I put in” to describe their own experiences. As you’ll see, their humility is as awesome as their generosity.

To be sure, the acts of kindness detailed in the stories linked below serve as inspiration for all of us to help make the world a better, more livable place. At AGCO, we hear that call too, working with groups here in North America, like FFA, and people abroad—those in Africa with whom we’re working to build a more sustainable agricultural infrastructure.

From those who travel to distant lands to assist people less fortunate, to those who work in their own community, each person profiled here said they helped themselves while helping others. Here then are their stories:

Rick Gray: This Massey Ferguson dealership executive is planting seeds.

Dee Doolittle: Caring for “retired” horses at Mitchell Farm.

Bill Troxel and Kristie Lee: Bill Troxel has turned giving into an art form.

John and Jean Partington: The Partingtons give of their time and effort at home and abroad.

John Varty and Molly Daley: Educating the populace about the realities of farming.

Gay Wagner: For Wagner, it’s all about the kids in his hometown.

David Diehl: A Montana farmer overcame huge obstacles and now helps others do the same.

From AGCO, A Helping Hand: AGCO Corporation and its employees give time and money for causes around the world.

We wish we could’ve featured more such generous people in this story. We know you’re out there. So, to all of you who offer a helping hand in acts simple and grand, we say thanks for every burden you’ve lifted and smile you’ve brought to another’s face.

Farmer of the Year: From the Land Up

Tommy Porter chokes up when he talks about the land. As he tops a hill, he leans on a young oak tree. Eyes misting. Cheeks flushing. Spring green hay fields and cattle pastures roll out behind him.

Porter owns these 600 acres and another 308 down the road. He raises beef cattle, poultry and hogs, but he subscribes to the belief that he’s a borrower, a steward.

“The bank and I may hold this property, but we’re here for a short time,” he says.

“To be able to tend to part of God’s creation, that means something to me.”

Just 30 miles to the southwest sits the glass-and-steel, corporate skyline of Charlotte. It’s North Carolina’s largest, most metropolitan city. Here on the outskirts of the town of Concord, however, Porter has carved out his peace.

Tommy Porter

Tommy Porter

By the late 1970s, he and his wife Vicki were ready to chase the dream and started their cattle herd with five cows. In the mid-1980s, they bought 200 acres of corn and soybeans, and converted them to pasture.

In 30-plus years, they have grown the herd to 350 Hereford-Angus cows and calves. Along the way, Porter invested in the chicken business, expanding that operation to 68,000 broiler pullets and 30,000 broiler egg layers for Tyson Foods. The third leg of the livestock operation includes 2,200 large, white sows that breed between 102 and 105 pigs per week for Murphy-Brown.

Porter’s family has been a large part of his farm’s success. Growing up, his sons, Derek and Jared, and his daughter, Erin, performed daily chores and remained interested in the farm. Even though they’ve all got other full-time careers these days, Derek, a firefighter, still works the farm on his days off. And Jared’s wife, Colleen, now manages the layer houses.

“Tommy started with a dream,” says Chip Blalock, executive director of Sunbelt Ag Expo. “He didn’t inherit anything. He did it all the old fashioned way from scratch.” Judges considered the scope of Porter’s success a major factor when naming him the 2011 Swisher Sweets/Sunbelt Expo Southeastern Farmer of the Year.

Part of Porter’s award as Farmer of the Year included the year-long use of any Massey Ferguson tractor serviced by Statesville Ag and Turf. He says he selected the MF5465 for its size. The 100 pto horsepower is the perfect fit for spreading fertilizer on his hay fields, then cutting and baling it when the time is right.

“It’s nice and roomy,” says Tommy, which is no surprise considering it has one of the largest cabs in its class. And the 61 square feet of glass translates to an immense amount of visibility. Another feature they really love is that the cab has its own suspension. “It makes a big difference when you spend 8 or 10 hours riding in something that’s comfortable,” says Tommy.

With one hand, they can move smoothly through the gears of the clutchless Dyna 4, 16-speed transmission. And because the environment, and quite frankly the economy, are so important to the Porters, the AGCO Power engine, with exceptional fuel economy and low emissions, makes a great deal of sense.

Because in the past there were no large Massey Ferguson dealers near the Porters, their farm has used John Deere equipment. But this honeymoon period with the MF5465 has made a believer of Derek, who uses it the most.

“Every time he uses it,” says Tommy, “he makes a point to say, ‘I really like that tractor. I like it better than the John Deere.’”

Read the full story at http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/from-the-land-up/.

Uncovering the Hesston Story: Lyle Yost

For 65 years, this rural burg on the eastern edge of the Great Prairie has been home to a brand that shares its name and is fertile ground for the development of game-changing agricultural machines.

Lyle Yost

Lyle Yost

During the Dust Bowl years, a “hill” on an otherwise flat stretch of the Great Prairie was often a piece of farm machinery buried by the era’s black blizzards of blowing topsoil, then deserted due to a hole in the social fabric called the Great Depression. Folks did what they could to survive, and a young Kansan named Lyle Yost helped make ends meet by scouring the countryside around his family’s farm for these mounds of dirt and steel.

“He was as young as 14,” says his daughter Susan, “and as soon as Dad learned how to drive, he would take the truck out into the countryside and look for [abandoned] farm equipment.” Yost, who passed away last year, would excavate what he found and bring it home, where he and his father would use it for spare parts or repair it for sale. “Not only did Dad learn how to build and rebuild [farm equipment], but he got acquainted with farmers,” Susan says. “He learned from them and found out what they needed. The idea of Hesston Corp. was planted when he was a teenager. I don’t think he knew the direction, but he knew that he had a calling, which was to help farmers.”

That direction became clear years later when he took on a problem that afflicted practically every farmer and harvester who owned a combine back in the day. Unloading just took too much time. Yost’s contemporaries used shovels and gravity to get the grain out of the bin, losing valuable time to get the grain up and out of harm’s way.

Yost, however, had an idea for a better way to move that grain, and after a particularly difficult harvest in 1947 and with memories of Dust Bowl storms still fresh, he and blacksmith Adin Holdeman went to work developing his unloading auger design. They made five of them in about a month, Susan recalls, and sent Yost’s cousin Earl Burner out to sell them. “He got back in 3 hours and said he needed 10 more.”

When they returned to the harvest the next summer using their new machine, others witnessed the speed at which the augers unloaded grain, and orders began arriving from as far as Texas and North Dakota. Buoyed by that success, the three men set up an assembly line near their homes in Hesston, and Hesston Manufacturing was born.

More than a half-century later, Yost’s focus on farmer-oriented solutions lives on today. Still located in the small, rural town where it all started, the Hesston facility has gone on to develop some of the most productive machines in agriculture, with the harvesting equipment made there now being sold worldwide.

Read the full story at http://www.myfarmlife.com/advantage/uncovering-the-hesston-story/.