Powered by Google
 

Archive for April, 2014

Benchmark for Power

Featuring the most powerful tractors ever made by Massey Ferguson, the new 8700 Series delivers ground-hugging torque and fuel efficiency unsurpassed in conventional tractor design. But the advantages don’t end there: All five models in the series also feature a number of other industry-leading components, including additional performance-enhancing innovations in engine technology, high-capacity hydraulics and ergonomic cab design.

To begin with, the new AGCO POWER™ 8.4-liter, 6-cylinder engine delivers 270 to 370 max engine HP. “Add to that,” says Ash Alt, AGCO field marketing manager, high-horsepower tractors, “the Engine Power Management [EPM] system provides a boost of an additional 30 HP that allows for faster engine response, providing more torque and more power to the application.”

The Dyna-VT continuously variable transmission (CVT) has also been updated. “Still providing the unmatched performance without the need to shift, clutch or change ranges,” says Alt, “the CVT on the 8700 Series further reduces fuel consumption, as well as wear and tear on the operator and equipment.”

The hydraulics on the 8700 Series are also best-in-class. Oil flow has been increased by more than 17% to 54 gallons per minute. “Couple that with industry-leading oil flow management,” adds Alt, “and the hydraulics on 8700 tractors provide greater capacity and precision, and faster response.”

The new CYCLAIR cooling system increases overall tractor performance “by maximizing air flow through a series of coolers and out through a redesigned hood,” says Alt. “Vents in the hood split the air flow to expel hot air, while directing cool, fresh air towards the main radiator.”

In addition to the CVT and EPM, the new AGCO POWER engine also employs features such as high-pressure common-rail fuel injection and twin turbochargers, to help deliver more torque and greater efficiency at lower engine speeds. In combination with third-generation Selective Catalytic Reduction (SCR) and cooled Exhaust Gas Recirculation (cEGR) technologies, the new power plant further reduces fuel usage and engine wear.

Also increasing the versatility of the tractors, the 8700 Series offers the option of a factory-installed front 3-point hitch and 1,000-rpm PTO. The front 3-point hitch has a lift capacity of 11,023 pounds, while new monobloc weights for front ballast are also available. The 8700 Series tractors also feature a redesigned, rear 3-point quick hitch that’s easier to use and offers an increased lift capacity of 26,355 pounds.

Inside the cab, the 8700 Series tractors blend comfort, noise reduction and operator-friendly ergonomics, all of which reduce operator fatigue. Easier to read and navigate, the new dashboard contains a Setup and Information Screen (SIS) that is 50% larger and offers 10 times better resolution and intuitive functionality. Cab updates also include relocated B-pillar controls for added convenience.

“These new 8700 Series tractors,” says Alt, “are not only the most powerful tractors ever built by Massey Ferguson, but the most intuitive and productive in their class. They’re the result of multiple engineering achievements developed with the needs of our customers in mind all the way.”

For more information on Massey Ferguson compact, utility and mid-sized tractors, visit masseyferguson.us.

Smoke Signals

Sweet, sticky, delicious ... and a family farm business.

Sweet, sticky, delicious … and a family farm business.

For a few weeks in winter or early spring, a talisman of sorts rises between the trees throughout rural Vermont. It is many places at once, yet the source, hidden amongst the hills, mountains and hollers, is not so disparate. On days when the wind is relatively still, these specter-like columns, comprised of smoke and vapor, can be seen for miles, beaconing those in the know.

They drive and trek, and as these seekers near their destinations, a faint yet familiar scent of something sweet intensifies the allure and further reinforces behavior learned from parents and grandparents, many of whom visited these same sites.

As is the tradition, these visitors are welcome. In from the cold and great outdoors, they enter the confines of cozy huts, known as sugarhouses, where the senses are greeted by steam and fragrance percolating off maple sap at the boiling point, and by the warmth of friends.

“It’s kind of like a big visiting contest,” says Hope Colburn, who along with her husband, Mark, runs Colburn’s Village View Maples, a sugaring operation near Glover, Vt. “During sugaring, people here drive around town to look for the steam and smoke from the sugaring, and they go from sugarhouse to sugarhouse … to be a part of this tradition, to witness it and visit. Of course, it dates back to … ” she pauses and laughs, “till who knows, but it’s definitely part of the heritage.”

From Vermont to Eastern Canada and across the prairie’s northern tier, sugaring—which typically lasts three to four weeks, beginning as early as January and ending as late as April—has signaled the end of winter. When daytime high temperatures reach the 40s (Fahrenheit) and nights dip back down into the 20s, a pressure is created in several varieties of maple trees, forcing the trees’ sugary sap to rise and flow out of breaks in the bark, whether natural or man-made.

Natives of these regions learned to collect the sap and boil it down long before Europeans arrived. They had their own rituals surrounding its collection and transformation into syrup, yet the addition of a warm sugarhouse has certainly added to that allure for the modern-era visitor. So have doughnuts.

“We go through a lot of them during sugaring season,” says Hope. Her mom makes the sinkers by the dozens, using maple syrup from the Colburns’ sugarhouse to feed those who visit at this critical time, when a year’s worth of nature’s and man’s work gets boiled down, literally, into sticky gold. Good friends help pass the time.

A sure-footed tractor helps the Colburns check tubing during sugaring.

Read the full story and watch Mark Colburn talk about why Massey Ferguson is twice the tractor of the lesser brands at http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/smoke-signals/.

AGCO Discusses the Future of Precision Farming on 21st Century Television

Since the launch of AGCO’s FuseTM Technologies strategy last summer, Fuse has continued to gain traction in global media—from product announcements to new strategic partnerships.  Last month, Eric Hansotia, Senior Vice President Global Harvesting and Advanced Technology Solutions (ATS), and Matt Rushing, Vice President of Product Management, ATS and Electronics Functional Group globally, discussed the future of precision farming and the challenges facing today’s growers on 21st Century Television.

AGCO Fuse Technologies on 21st Century Television

AGCO’s own Eric Hansotia & Matt Rushing discuss the future of precision farming on 21st Century Television.

21st Century Television is an award winning business show that provides its business viewers an in depth opportunity to find solutions to industry problems from some of the top business leaders from across the world. With more than 5000 companies participating on over 500 shows, 21st Century Television airs on cable networks that reach over 100 million viewers worldwide. The Fuse Technologies segment aired in nearly 50 countries across 4 continents.

On the show, Eric and Matt provided an overview of Fuse Technologies—AGCO’s global corporate initiative that addresses all aspects of precision farming technology and how farmers can optimize their operations through AGCO products and new services. They discussed how improvements in precision farming technology will be key for solving today’s farming challenges.

To view the video, click here. For more information about Fuse Technologies, visit www.agcotechnologies.com.

My AGCO Ambassador Experience at Africa Summit 2014

Written by: Joy Jelimo Chelagat, 2014 AGCO Africa Ambassador

Joy Jelimo Chelagat, AGCO's 2014 Africa Ambassador

Joy Jelimo Chelagat, AGCO’s 2014 Africa Ambassador

On the 15th of January at 5:00 am in the morning I drove to Jomo Kenyatta International Airport on my trip to Berlin, Germany. Just five months before I had seen a competition online for an ambassadorship opportunity. Having only a week to the deadline, I was pretty sure that my chances were slim, but I decided to apply anyway.

To my surprise, the AGCO team got in contact with me. A few Skype interviews later I was informed that I could represent Africa at the annual AGCO Africa Summit in Berlin. Two months passed by fast and I was aboard a plane heading to Germany. The trip was long and the weather was a stark difference from the sunny Nairobi climes, but the warm welcome of the team in the Adlon Hotel made me feel at home.

The day after I arrived I hit the ground running. I had a meeting with a team of AGCO people to prepare for the activities scheduled. It was only our first meeting yet they were very friendly and resourceful. I also met Sue Musunga Chuzu, who was the first AGCO Africa Ambassador and who works now as Marketing Services Specialist at AGCO in Zambia. She shared her experiences with me and gave me some presentation tips for moderating the conference.

Agriculture is Universal

One of my tasks as Africa Ambassador was to represent AGCO at the International Green Week fair. The “Grüne Woche”, as the Germans call it, is an agricultural trade show that attracts exhibitors from around the world. Together with Marco Prehn, Sahra Malin, Sue Chuzu and Philip De Leon from AGCO we talked to numerous people about what the company is doing in Africa. One thing was evident during the fair: agriculture is a global concern. Even though the visitors and exhibitors were from far flung corners of the globe, they all came together in one place for once cause: agriculture.

The night before the AGCO Africa Summit we had an exclusive dinner with the conference‘s speakers and the top brass of the AGCO team. The room was full of exceptional people who had done great things for the African continent. From the conversations we had that evening, I could tell that the summit would be full of wonderful insights. As I woke up that Monday I was fully charged for the conference.

African Solutions

Walking into the conference hall, the excitement was palpable. You could see crowds of people huddled together immersed in conversation. You could spot top decision makers of key sectors of the agricultural industry. As the program kicked off, I was slightly nervous but as we moved along I eased up. Each speaker rose to the podium with wonderful ideas about the improvement of the agriculture industry in Kenya and on the African continent.

The speakers and panelists talked about their activities in Africa and about what they plan to do in days to come. Robert Sichinga, Agriculture Minister of Zambia, riled the crowd when he passionately explained why solutions to African agriculture have to be African. Another topic that got the audience excited was the appeal to make agriculture “sexy” for it to attract young people. Several speakers also emphasized the issue of innovation. Thus by the end of the full-day event I was more convinced than ever that agriculture is not only the present but also the future for Africa.

Yet, my trip was not all business. I had several opportunities to shop and tour the German capital. Berlin is a beautiful city with rich history: I visited the Brandenburg Gate, Checkpoint Charlie and the Holocaust memorial. Another highlight of the trip was the opportunity to meet and make friends with remarkable people from all around the globe.

All in all, this journey was an inspirational and eye-opening experience. I was able to see how small-scale innovations in the field have a global impact on food security. The importance of efficient production, transportation and distribution was also brought home. At the end of the trip I felt charged to take up my role as AGCO Africa Ambassador for the year 2014.