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Archive for June, 2013

Bale With Confidence

“There are only a few things we can control,” says hay grower Brett Bunker about farming. “So anything I can do to give me an advantage, I need to do it.”

Bale with confidence.

Bale with confidence.

Bunker says he gets the edge he needs with AGCO Buffered Acid Hay Preservative and his HayBoss G2™, a precision monitoring and automatic preservative application system. Both help guarantee his hay quality by dealing with moisture levels in his bales. They also help him maintain his growing cycle of four crops a year on the 1,000 acres near Delta, Utah, where he and his family grow alfalfa to sell to dairy farmers.

“If I get too much dew overnight, I can still bale and get my hay out of the field with a little higher moisture. Or if I need to bale before a rain and push it a little bit, I can do that instead of letting the storm hit, then letting it dry back down again.

“The quicker I can get hay off the field,” adds Bunker, “the better the hay and the quicker I can get growing on the next crop. [HayBoss] can save me anywhere from a half a day to even on the outside of five days.”

“Often, the producer can’t wait for things like the dew to dry, and we understand that,” says Jeff Roberts, president of Harvest Tec, the company that manufactures HayBoss and AGCO Buffered Acid Hay Preservative, and markets them through AGCO Parts. “The main benefit with HayBoss and the preservative is that extended operating window, by raising the level of moisture at which hay can be baled.”

Roberts adds that HayBoss provides the producer peace of mind. Its moisture monitoring and application offer accuracy unmatched in the industry, and they work seamlessly with Hesston balers.

“The AGCO Buffered Acid Hay Preservative is also made with the same care and consistency. That makes it far more reliable than other brands and totally safe for animals, the environment, the operators and their equipment.

“With HayBoss,” Roberts continues, “the grower gains confidence that their window is expanded into the upper ranges … as high as 27% moisture for large square balers and slightly higher for round and small square bales. That,” he adds, “has the potential to be a good contributor to overall profitability.”

Read the full story as well as tips on baling quality hay at http://www.myfarmlife.com/advantage/bale-with-confidence/.

Fendt 936 Vario Heads Out For Big European “Go East” Tour

Under the motto “Go East”, the Fendt sales engineer Jan-Christoff Hoffmann started out from Marktoberdorf today in a 936 Vario. His destination: a large-scale farm in the Ukraine with some 300,000 hectares of land. He will travel about 3,000 kilometres in the next four weeks to get there. He will drive through seven countries and work on different farms in the Czech Republic, Slovakia, Hungary, Romania, Moldavia and the Ukraine – doing tillage, grassland, transport and harvesting work as well as performing construction and forestry operations.

The team maps out the tour across seven countries.

The team maps out the tour across seven countries.

Together with the agricultural engineering magazine profi, AGCO/Fendt will accompany the tour with a film crew, so that a brand-new, exciting DVD of the Go East Tour will be available for the Agritechnica 2013. The logo for the tour is a sun, because the sun rises in the East. That is the goal that drivers drive towards on their tractors in the morning and have in the rearview mirror in the evening after a long day at work.

See where Jan-Christoff Hoffmann and his 936 Vario are right now. Visit: https://www.facebook.com/FendtGlobal

 

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AGCO Prepares Youth For Careers In Agriculture

ifama

AGCO announced their sponsorship of the 23rd annual International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA) World Forum and Symposium.  The conference takes place in Atlanta, GA June 18-20 with a mission to develop and sustain talent across the diverse value chain of global food production – from smallholder farmers in emerging regions of the world to the sophisticated commercial agricultural practices in mature economies. “It is a natural fit for AGCO to sponsor this organization and we are very happy to support young people who have chosen to pursue a career in agriculture,” said Martin Richenhagen, Chairman, President and CEO of AGCO. “Education is key to the advancement of the agricultural industry and key to the advancement of global economies.”

The Earth’s population is set to reach 9 billion by the year 2050. However, the number of young adults going into the agriculture industry is quickly declining. Global farm productivity has to change in order to keep up with growing needs for food, fuel and fiber and the industry needs the best and brightest minds in order to keep up with demand.

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Eric Raby, Vice President, Global Marketing & Commercial Development will be a guest speaker at the event on June 20. In his speech, he will outline how Africa can play a decisive role in transforming global agriculture as well as what AGCO is learning from working in emerging markets. “AGCO knows the importance of attracting high quality talent to the ag industry because they will set the stage to feed, clothe and fuel the world for generations to come,” said Raby. “Even with today’s economy, people have not and will not stop eating; therefore, agriculture leads the way in career opportunities for the graduates of today and tomorrow.”

About IFAMA

The International Food and Agribusiness Management Association (IFAMA) is a nonprofit organization that unites industry, students, academics, government leaders and other key stakeholders across the value chain of food production and consumption – to improve the global food and agribusiness system in response to the changing needs of the world. Founded in 1990 IFAMA fosters information sharing, knowledge advancement, discussion, debate, networking and career development through members across more than 50 countries. The annual IFAMA World Forum and Symposium is the organization’s cornerstone event, where leading experts address the most current and pressing issues in food and agriculture. Visit www.ifama.org to learn more.

A Father’s Guidance

Steve Snider still follows the advice of his late father and plans to hand it off, along with the family farm, to the next generation.

The Snider farm is in an irrevocable trust, but only through two generations, ensuring it will remain intact for Steve’s two sons, while allowing for eventual adjustments in the face of certain change.

The Snider farm is in an irrevocable trust, but only through two generations, ensuring it will remain intact for Steve’s two sons, while allowing for eventual adjustments in the face of certain change.

Winter farm work in Lerna, Ill., was typically slow. So, Bill Snider encouraged his teenage son Steve to spend those days looking off the farm for productive things to do. The young man occupied his time with odd jobs, including a stint as an equipment operator at a landfill. He also completed computer science courses at the nearby college after the subject piqued his interest.

However, the elder Snider’s nudging served a purpose greater than earning extra money or filling the idle hours. It was a proverbial push from the nest.

“Looking back, Dad was urging me to get out and not just be dependent on the farm,” says Steve, who is now 38. “He wanted me to broaden my spectrum on the world … to get a sense of the world and how other bosses are, to see how things work differently.”

But Steve says his dad was the best boss of them all. “He taught me about management,” says Steve. “Not to overextend yourself. Stay within your means. Try to be a good steward of the ground. And he taught me about conservation, so you don’t lose what you’ve got.”

Steve’s off-the-farm experiences just seemed to make him appreciate his family’s corn and bean operation all the more. “I decided that coming back to the farm was the only thing to do,” he says. “It still felt right.”

Bill eventually fell ill, and when he passed last Leap Day, Steve was grief-stricken but ready to take over. Today, Steve manages about 1,600 acres, with close to 1,400 of those planted in corn and beans. Another 40 of those acres are dedicated to a herd of roughly 20 Black Angus cattle. The rest are wooded areas.

Steve says the legacy of that land was very important to his father. Because of that, Bill’s wish was that upon his death, the farm would be placed in an irrevocable land trust, stipulating that it remain intact and in the Snider family through two more generations.

“We just didn’t want someone else coming in and taking it away,” says Steve’s mother Barb. “That’s what Steve’s grandpa would have wanted too. He worked hard for that.”

For expert advice on land trusts, and to read why Bill and Steve Snider switched from Deere to Massey Ferguson equipment (hint: better fuel efficiency and comfort), visit http://www.myfarmlife.com/features/a-fathers-guidance/.

Charity Tractor Convoy to Conquer Morecambe Sands

Sunday, 2 June 2013

A convoy of vintage red and grey Massey Ferguson tractors is to cross the hazardous sands of the UK’s Morecambe Bay in a charity run to raise money for Diabetes UK.

Led by retired Massey Ferguson employee Bob Dickman, up to 20 tractors will make the 17 mile (27 km) fully-guided return trip on 2 June.

81-year-old Bob, who retired in 1995, spent 40 years working for Massey Ferguson culminating in his role as Export Service Manager. He will be driving a fully reconditioned 1954 Ferguson TEF 20 tractor across the sands.

Helping to raise money for Diabetes UK, former Massey Ferguson employee, Bob Dickman is leading a vintage tractor drive across Morecambe Bay in his 1954 Ferguson TEF 20.

Helping to raise money for Diabetes UK, former Massey Ferguson employee, Bob Dickman is leading a vintage tractor drive across Morecambe Bay in his 1954 Ferguson TEF 20.

“A similar crossing was undertaken by Land Rovers some years ago but this is the first time for tractors,” he says. “I am  raising money for a Diabetes UK Type 1 research project after seeing the impact the disease has had on the lives of family and friends.”

Massey Ferguson is supporting the event with the supply of raffle prizes including an all-expenses-paid trip to its tractor factory in Beauvais, France.

Bob’s mission has also attracted the support of some of his former Massey Ferguson colleagues now retired including Glynn Patrick who was Managing Director of European Distribution and Gordon Graham, previously General Sales Manager Eastern Europe. Glynn will be behind the wheel of his family farm’s refurbished 1968 MF 135 and Gordon will be assisting with the logistics of the event. Other ex-Massey Ferguson employees will be among the spectators.

At low tide which occurs at 1.45pm on 2 June, the notorious Morecambe Bay in northwest England exposes 120 square miles (310 sq km) of sand and flats. To ensure the safest route across the bay, Steve Morris, another key organiser of the tractor convoy, worked closely with a father and son team of experienced guides who use their own tractors to fish Morecambe Bay sands.

The guided crossing, which starts and finishes at Cark Airfield near Flookburgh is expected to take three to four hours. Four- year-old Neev Renton from Cumbria who suffers from Type 1 diabetes will set the tractors off at 12 noon.

Anyone interested in sponsoring or watching the event can visit: www.justgiving.com/bobdickmanMF-fergusontractorroadrun