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11th Massey Ferguson Journalism Award awards the best Brazilian and South American agribusiness work pieces

On the evening of October 4, in a ceremony at Casa Vetro, in Porto Alegre-RS, the winners of the Massey Ferguson Journalism Award 2012 were announced.  The event gathered journalists from all over Brazil who stood out for their commitment and quality in publishing news on South American and Brazilian agribusiness, as well as media professionals of Rio Grande do Sul and executives of Massey Ferguson and AGCO.

During the ceremony the senior vice president and general manager of AGCO for South America, André Carioba, and the marketing director of AGCO, Fábio Piltcher, highlighted the record of submissions in 2012: 287 work pieces. They also spoke about the challenge of breaking barriers in the journalism specialized in agribusiness. “Social networks work today with the immediacy of information, so journalists have strong competition and need to make use not only of originality, but also of the creative ability to keep journalism alive and interesting to the reader,” said Fabio Piltcher.

“The first edition of the Award had only 34 entries. In 2012, there was almost 300. The goal at the time was to honor the talent and dedication of media professionals that recorded the history of Brazilian agriculture,” Carioba recalls. “Today, the pieces submitted go beyond that; they bring information on technology to improve field activities, update farmers on the global agricultural scenario, how this scenario will impact their business and how some experiences may facilitate their work, besides adding value to the product and consequently to the farmer’s business,” concluded the executive.

The finalists stood out for their originality of theme, research, argumentation, relevance for agribusiness, structure and even interactivity in the case of Internet use. “The pieces submitted presented very high standard, I followed other editions of the Award and it is noticeable that journalists have been increasingly engaged year after year,” said Carlos Henrique Carvalho, head of the panel and executive president of the Brazilian Association of Communication Agencies (ABRACOM).

“We appreciate the participation of all journalists that allowed the record number of entries this year. We congratulate everyone for the effort, dedication and contribution to Brazilian agribusiness,” concluded Eduardo Nunes, manager of marketing and communications of AGCO for South America.

São Paulo topped the ranking of states with the highest number of submissions, 37%, followed by Rio Grande do Sul with 18%, and in third place Goiás with 9% of the journalists who competed for the R$10 thousand prizes.

Get to know now the winners of the Massey Ferguson Journalism Award 2012:

Internet Category

Andriolli de Brites da Costa from Campo Grande, Mato Grosso do Sul (MS), with the work “History of the Breed: Nellore” published on the portal Rural Centro on July 8, 2011.

Photography Category

Valdemir Magalhães Cunha from São Paulo(SP), with the work “Late Cocoa” Globo Rural magazine published on November 20, 2011.

Newspaper Category

Luiz Silveira from São Paulo (SP), with the work “Agriculture seeks a way out to keep pace with productivity” published in the Brasil Econômico newspaper on February 21, 2012.

Magazine Category

Denise Sauressig from Porto Alegre (RS) with the work “Management, The rural business in good hands” published in the magazine A Granja on September 1st, 2012.

TV Category

Cesar Dassié from São Paulo (SP) with the work “Rural roads”, shown in the program Globo Rural, at Globo on March 20.

Students Category

Thaís Bianchin Goes from Nuporanga (SP) with the work “Organic Coffee: from crop to cup – Challenge and passion in the art of producing very special grains” published on July 7, 2011.

Mercosul Category

Roderick Mac Lean from Buenos Aires, Argentina, with the work “Las huellas de los alimentos” published on the blog Faros Largos on July 8,2011.

2 Responses to “11th Massey Ferguson Journalism Award awards the best Brazilian and South American agribusiness work pieces”

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